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Harper Lee's Condition Debated By Friends, Fans And Now State of Alabama

FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2007 file photo, "To Kill A Mockingbird" author Harper Lee smiles during a ceremony honoring the four
FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2007 file photo, "To Kill A Mockingbird" author Harper Lee smiles during a ceremony honoring the four new members of the Alabama Academy of Honor, at the state Capitol in Montgomery, Ala. The ascendance of Tonja Carter, who worked in Lee's older sister Alice Lee’s law office before going to the University of Alabama law school, graduating in 2006 and becoming her partner, brought more aggressive legal tactics on Harper Lee’s behalf. (AP Photo/Rob Carr, File)

MONROEVILLE, Ala. — The doubts arose almost immediately when HarperCollins announced last month that it would release a rediscovered book by Harper Lee: Did Ms. Lee — 88, publicity-shy and famously resistant to producing a follow-up to her masterpiece, “To Kill a Mockingbird” — really want to publish a second novel that she wrote and set aside more than a half-century ago?

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