SCIENCE

You Guys, There Is An Adorable Heart On The Sun

It's pretty sweet.

A giant sunspot has apparently turned on its love light, morphing into the shape of a heart.

Known as AR2529, the dazzling area will face Earth for approximately one more week, according to The Washington Post.

A sunspot is a region on the sun's surface that is temporarily cool and dark compared to the surrounding area. How cool could that be?

According to NASA, "the average surface temperature of the sun is 6000 degrees Celsius and ... sunspots are about 1500 degrees Celsius cooler than the area surrounding them (still very hot)."

Sunspots are known for being associated with solar flares and coronal mass ejections, but this one has been relatively temperate outside of releasing a small CME on Sunday, Space.com reported. (NASA explains the difference between the two here.)

According to Space.com, the region is the size of several planet Earths. That's big enough to be viewed by amateur astronomers, but don't even think about snapping a picture unless you have the proper safety equipment.

Here's a close look:

A zoomed in view of the sunspot, showing its heart shape.
A zoomed in view of the sunspot, showing its heart shape.

And another view, published by NASA: 

A large-scale image of the sun showing AR2529.
A large-scale image of the sun showing AR2529.
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