IMPACT

Here's How You Can Save The World And Make Money While You're At It

A fisherman crosses the mangrove on his canoe on November 11, 2011 in Belo-sur-Mer, western Madagascar.  Mangroves spread ove
A fisherman crosses the mangrove on his canoe on November 11, 2011 in Belo-sur-Mer, western Madagascar. Mangroves spread over thousands of hectares of Madagascar's west coast, rich with fish and crabs. But fishermen have declared some areas off limits, hoping to ensure their future catches. 'The communities chose to close several sites for four months of the year, to allow the crabs and fish to reproduce,' said Thomas, an official with Blue Ventures, a British marine conservation group that backs the project. Three sites totalling 200 hectares around the town of the Belo-sur-mer were chosen by the communities to pilot the project in the coastal forests that cover 4,000 square kilometres (1,500 square miles) of Madagascar. AFP PHOTO/ ALINE RANAIVOSON ***TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY ALINE RANAIVOSON*** (Photo credit should read ALINE RANAIVOSON/AFP/Getty Images)

What do you call someone who runs a successful business that aims to make the world a better place? A CEO with a conscience? A do-good bottom-liner?

At the Skoll World Forum this week in Oxford, England, the preferred term is social entrepreneur. In fact, the conference is completely devoted to the idea — and promoting its rising stars.

Young entrepreneurs are invited to join veterans for workshops, talks and confabs. Awards are given for "social entrepreneurship."

Read more on www.npr.org

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