POLITICS

House Democrats Move To Reprimand Republicans Who Helped Incite Riot

One resolution aims to censure Rep. Mo Brooks of Alabama, who spoke at President Trump's Wednesday event that led to the Capitol storming.

House Democrats introduced a pair of resolutions Monday that would formally censure and potentially remove some of their Republican colleagues who helped encourage last week’s deadly insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.

One resolution, introduced by Reps. Tom Malinowski (D-N.J.) and Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.), aims to “condemn and censure” Rep. Mo Brooks (R-Ala.) for his role in the riot. Brooks had taken the stage at President Donald Trump’s rally that day to challenge the results of the presidential election, saying, “Today is the day American patriots start taking down names and kicking ass.”

“Representative Brooks’ actions encouraged and fueled the mob [and] brought shame on the House of Representatives, jeopardizing its reputation and institutional integrity, as well as the safety of its Members and staff,” the resolution reads.

“Brooks’ dangerous rhetoric will not go without consequences,” Wasserman Schultz said Monday.

The other resolution, introduced by Rep. Cori Bush (D-Mo.), seeks to launch a House Ethics Committee investigation into whether members of Congress violated their oath of office by contesting the results of the election. The 14th Amendment forbids anyone who has “engaged in insurrection or rebellion” against the United States from holding elected office. If completed, an ethics investigation could lead to the expulsion of certain lawmakers. 

“We can’t have unity without accountability,” Bush said in a tweet about her resolution. 

More than 100 House Republicans voted to reject the election results from Pennsylvania and Arizona last Wednesday.

They included Reps. Paul Gosar (R-Ariz.) and Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.), who allegedly were involved in organizing the Jan. 6 gathering that led to the violence. (Biggs’ office has denied that he had any involvement.) Senators who have cast doubt on the legitimacy of the election and attempted to overturn the results, such as Ted Cruz (R-Texas) and Josh Hawley (R-Mo.), are also facing heavy criticism and calls to resign.

A number of U.S. companies are also suspending donations to the 147 Republican members of Congress who objected to certifying the election results, The New York Times reported Monday.

Five people were killed after Trump’s supporters marched down the National Mall to break into the Capitol building and attempt to halt Congress’ formal certification process for the election. Many of them carried “Stop the Steal” signs.

Trump, who lost the 2020 election by about 7 million votes, has baselessly claimed that there was a conspiracy to stop him from winning another term.