SCIENCE

Hundreds Of New Species Have Been Found In The Himalayas In The Last 5 Years

Talk about biodiversity -- you couldn't make these creatures up!

A blue-eyed frog. A snake with jewel-like skin. A cute little monkey that just can't seem to stop sneezing.

What sound like fantasy creatures are actually living, breathing animals--and they're just three of more than 200 new animal species discovered in the Eastern Himalayas during the past five years, according to a new report from the World Wildlife Fund.

In all, 211 animal species have been discovered recently in the area, according to the report.

The region, which spans Bhutan, northeastern India, Nepal, northern Myanmar, and southern Tibet, is considered one of the most biologically diverse places on Earth. If there's any doubt of that, just scroll down to see a selection of photos from the report.

Enjoy! 

  • Leptobrachium bompu. The strikingly blue-eyed frog. 
    © Sanjay Sondhi
    Leptobrachium bompu. The strikingly blue-eyed frog. 
  • Musa markkui. A new species of banana. 
    © R.Gogoi
    Musa markkui. A new species of banana. 
  • Channa andrao. The dwarf ‘snake head’ fish.
    © Henning Strack Hansen
    Channa andrao. The dwarf ‘snake head’ fish.
  • Protobothrops himalayansus. The Himalayan pit viper with jewel-patterned skin.
    © Liang Zhang
    Protobothrops himalayansus. The Himalayan pit viper with jewel-patterned skin.
  • Impatiens lohitensis. The wild balsam.
    © R.Gogoi
    Impatiens lohitensis. The wild balsam.
  • Elachura formosa. The spotted wren-babbler. 
    © Ramki Sreenivasan Conservation India
    Elachura formosa. The spotted wren-babbler. 
  • Rhinopithecus strykeri. The sneezy snub-nose monkey. 
    Martin Aveling
    Rhinopithecus strykeri. The sneezy snub-nose monkey. 
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