Is North Korea Planning A Nuclear Pearl Harbor For America?

In response to the new sanctions imposed upon North Korea by the United Nations Security Council, the official external news agency of the DPRK (Democratic People's Republic of Korea), which goes by the surreal name of "Korea Asia-Pacific Peace Committee," issued the following statement:

Let’s reduce the U.S. mainland into ashes and darkness. Let’s vent our spite with mobilization of all retaliation means which have been prepared till now.

The implication is clear; Pyongyang is threatening to unleash a salvo of long-range ballistic missiles tipped with thermonuclear warheads at America's largest cities. This call for nuclear genocide is not only aimed at the United States. The same statement also included this apocalyptic message for Japan:

The four islands of the archipelago should be sunken into the sea by the nuclear bomb of Juche. Japan is no longer needed to exist near us

There is a tendency by foreign observers, including in the U.S., to dismiss North Korean threats to annihilate the United States and its population as typical bellicosity that periodically emanates from Pyongyang, not to be taken seriously. At one time, many American experts also claimed that North Korea's boasts of nuclear weapons advancement were highly exaggerated. However, the latest nuclear test detonation and ICBM launch proves that the reclusive nation's ability to launch a nuclear attack on the continental United States has advanced far more rapidly than they had originally forecasted. For that reason alone, a warning by Pyongyang that it seeks the genocidal annihilation of America, along with Japan, should not be frivolously ignored and treated as propaganda.

There is an historical parallel to what is unfolding in North Korea. In 1941 the U.S. sought to pressure Imperial Japan to end its war of conquest in China and expansionism in Southeast Asia through the application of economic sanctions. As the sanctions became increasingly severe, the Japanese press warned through statements by authoritative sources that their nation would be forced to strike back militarily at the U.S. and its allies to break the economic stranglehold being imposed on them.

The reaction of Pyongyang to the most recent U.N. sanctions has disturbing parallels with Japan's threats in late 1941. However, there is one essential difference. When Japan decided to attack the U.S. it dispatched a naval armada that took eleven days to reach its target, which were battleships and airfields. If North Korea unleashes an attack on America, it will take half an hour for its nuclear-tipped ballistic missiles to reach their targets, which will be the nation's largest population centers.

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