BUSINESS

Las Vegas Sands Under Investigation For Corruption, Admits Violations 'Likely'

FILE - In this April 12, 2012 file photo, Las Vegas Sands Chairman and CEO Sheldon Adelson speaks at a news conference for th
FILE - In this April 12, 2012 file photo, Las Vegas Sands Chairman and CEO Sheldon Adelson speaks at a news conference for the Sands Cotai Central in Macau. New campaign finance figures for the final two weeks of the 2012 campaign show that Las Vegas casino magnate Sheldon Adelson and his wife gave $10 million to a "super" political committee supporting losing GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney. Adelson, who owns casinos in Las Vegas, Singapore and the Chinese territory of Macau, has been the top donor in the 2012 race, providing more than $54 million supporting Romney and other GOP presidential candidates and an additional $18 million for other Republicans. The new $10 million figure for Adelson and his wife, Miriam, is for the pro-Romney Restore Our Future super PAC, but their totals could grow as final campaign finance tallies are reported Thursday, Dec. 7. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung, File)

March 2 (Reuters) - Las Vegas Sands Corp said it "likely" violated the federal Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which outlaws the bribery of foreign officials, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing on Friday.

The filing marks the first disclosure by the casino operator, controlled by founder and billionaire Republican donor Sheldon Adelson, that it was under investigation.

The SEC subpoenaed company documents in February 2011 relating to its compliance with the antibribery act while the U.S. Department of Justice also advised Sands it was conducting an investigation, the company said in its annual report filing.

"There were likely violations of the books and records and internal controls provisions of the FCPA," the company said.

Sands spokesman Ron Reese said on Saturday he had no additional comment beyond the SEC filing.

Reuters reported exclusively in August that Sands allowed a man identified by the U.S. Senate as an organized crime figure to move a $100,000 gambling credit from a Las Vegas casino to one of its Macau casinos.

The company's findings are related to deals in mainland China led by executives no longer employed at Sands, the Wall Street Journal reported, sourcing a person familiar with the matter.

Sands, in the filing, said the issue would have no material impact on the company's financial records and that it would not need to restate any past financial statements.

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