QUEER VOICES

LGBT Wellness Roundup: October 10

Each week HuffPost Gay Voices, in a partnership with bloggers Liz Margolies and Scout, brings you a round up of some of the biggest LGBT wellness stories from the past seven days. For more LGBT Wellness, visit our page dedicated to the topic here.

  • 1 What's the Real LGBT Health Epidemic? Substance Abuse
    Author Mark Watson takes a sharp look at the issues of <a href="http://chicagophoenix.com/2014/10/05/the-real-lgbt-health-epi
    Henrik Sorensen via Getty Images
    Author Mark Watson takes a sharp look at the issues of substance abuse in the LGBT communities. An estimated 20-30% of us abuse intoxicating substances compared to only 9% of the total population and we have an extraordinarily high smoking rate. He concludes with the hope that the "meteoric rise" in acceptance of LGBT people helps drive this epidemic down. That's one bet we'd lay our money on.
  • 2 First Comes Marriage, Then Comes ... Better Mental Health
    The biggest health news this week is the legal decisions which now recognize gay marriage in <a href="https://www.huffpost.co
    Hill Street Studios via Getty Images
    The biggest health news this week is the legal decisions which now recognize gay marriage in 5 states and have paved the way for it in a half a dozen more. A study several years ago showed LGBT people reported more mental health problems in years after negative civil rights battles -- so don't underestimate the effects a positive decision can have on our collective mental health.
  • 3 $800k Study to Explore FTM Sexual Health
    Congratulations to our friend Dr. Sari Reisner at The Fenway Institute for a <a href="http://www.edgeonthenet.com/news/local/
    Dana Neely via Getty Images
    Congratulations to our friend Dr. Sari Reisner at The Fenway Institute for a new award to study the sexual health of FTM (female-to-male) individuals. As Dr. Reisner reports, evidence shows over 1/3 of FTM trans people are not up to date on cervical cancer screenings. The new study will compare different methods for ensuring the population gets appropriate sexual health care.
  • 4 Large Study Explores Mental Health in Sexual Minority Male Teens
    A <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25294230" target="_blank">new study</a> interviewed almost 500 urban sexual min
    David Henderson via Getty Images
    A new study interviewed almost 500 urban sexual minority men ages 16-20 to bring us the news that 1/3 experienced Major Depressive Episodes, 1/5 struggled with alcohol abuse, and 16% had PTSD. Black participants were less likely to experience many of these issues, while bisexuals had 2x the risk of lifetime PTSD than others.
  • 5 Gay Male Breast Cancer Survivor Works to Raise Awareness, End Stigma
    "I happen to be a gay male who has breast cancer," says Michael Kovarik. But he didn't stop at struggling to fight the diseas
    Vstock via Getty Images
    "I happen to be a gay male who has breast cancer," says Michael Kovarik. But he didn't stop at struggling to fight the disease, he also wrote a book to raise awareness of this little-known issue. Catch Healing Within: My Journey With Breast Cancer here.
  • 6 Smoking Linked to HPV, Oral Cancers
    LGBT people smoke at rates 50% higher than the general population, which is why new evidence about how cigarettes and other t
    Adam Gault via Getty Images
    LGBT people smoke at rates 50% higher than the general population, which is why new evidence about how cigarettes and other tobacco products increase the risk of contracting HPV16, a virus transmitted by oral sex, is particularly disturbing. HPV16 is found in 80% of oral cancers.
  • 7 Out & Visible Above Age 45
    SAGE has released the findings of a new study on the concerns of LGBT adults ages 45-75. Highlights include a common fear tha
    Bonnie Schupp via Getty Images
    SAGE has released the findings of a new study on the concerns of LGBT adults ages 45-75. Highlights include a common fear that coming out to their healthcare provider is risky. And 2/3 of transgender adults fear having limited access to healthcare as they age. Read top 5 things to know from this study here.
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