Libyan Oil Is Thicker Than American Blood

In a chillingly cynical excuse Scotland released the former Libyan intelligence agent Abdel Basset Ali al-Megrahi who blew up Pan Am flight 103 in December 1988 over Lockerbie, Scotland. The pretext "compassion" for the allegedly terminally ill Libyan, barely disguised the real reason -- oil buried deep in the Libyan sand.

The murder of 189 dead American, and 81 other nationals including 11 from Lockerbie matters not when Libya conditions British oil companies' concessions for exploration in the release of their imprisoned terrorist.

Justifying the unconscious release, David Blair wrote in the Telegraph: "Libya, under the newly pragmatic rule of Col Muammar Gaddafi...ideally placed to help us combat terrorism and nuclear proliferation - the two biggest threats to British national security. So keeping Libya happy matters a great deal, particularly as the country also possesses 42 billion barrels of proven oil reserves and a similar abundance of natural gas." This new friendship won BP the world's largest oil exploration. Therefore says Blair, "Britain needs to make sure that nothing interferes with..."our bilateral relationship" with Libya. If that means sending one 57-year-old prisoner back to his homeland... allowing him to be released on "compassionate grounds" - then so be it."

Blair, whose fictional reporting in 2002 on the Israeli fight against Palestinian terrorist in Jenin, took years to refute - Human Rights International, and even the U.N. issued reports refuting Blair's and the Palestinian bogus claims - extols the "companionate" release of the Libyan terrorist, and praises earlier British governments who ignored large-scale atrocities the world over, because the British national interest was on the side of the aggressors.

To remove any doubt where Blair is proud of the Britain's pragmatic "national interest" policy decisions, he reminds us how smart was the decision to quash the 2006 Serious Fraud Office investigation into a £1 billion bribe from BAE Systems to Prince Bandar bin Sultan. The investigation stopped as soon as the Saudis threatened to cancel the £40 billion arms deal for which Bandar and other Saudi royal family members received hefty payments. And Blair applauds that decision because "it was a classic case of interests triumphing over values."

British values? To better comply with the latest radical Muslim dictate, growing number of municipalities in the U.K. ordered swimmers to wear "Burkinis"; The man "must cover the body from the navel to the knee and females must be covered from the neck to the ankles and wrists".

Clearly, justice and national pride are missing from the British political lexicon. In effort to downplay the terrorist release, Britain's Prime Minister Gordon Brown, wrote a personal letter to Gaddafi, asking the Libyan dictator to treat the affair "with sensitivity." The Libyan promptly leaked the letter, and the terrorist was received in as a hero by cheering crowds in Tripoli.

Yet, Blair is so hard at applauding England's "pragmatic" choices that he fails to notice that that "pragmatism" led to the downfall of the once powerful British Empire, and to the rapid pace of Islamization of the remains of Great Britain. Then again, he - like a growing number of British politicians - probably see nothing wrong with that.

In the meantime, the U.S. reaction to all this has been muted, perhaps because the U.S. is also eying prospect oil deals with Libya.

Rachel Ehrenfeld, author of Funding Evil: How Terrorism is Financed and How to Stop It, is director of the American Center for Democracy