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Live Earth

All I feel going into this event is hope. And lots of it. After all, even the hardest moments in life have some hope hiding in there somewhere. And that's where the musicians come in. We deal in hope every day.
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I woke up this morning with hope. Excitement, even. Live Earth happening, and I'm starting to feel the first ripples of what could become a revolution.

I hope that for all the cynicism that's existed around this subject, we can all uncross our arms long enough to give this event a chance to impact the world in the way that I'm beginning to feel that it could. Now isn't the time to dissect the rights and wrongs. (If you're hoping Live Earth doesn't work, you have a lot of soul-searching to do.)

With this kind of lineup, there's no cause or crisis that wouldn't be positively affected by an event of this scope. Live Earth isn't a show -- it's a showing, a presentation of an idea. Artists like us don't just get together to each play 20 minute sets every weekend, you know. We're also usually pretty sensitive about the order in which we take the stage, and I've got no problems with my 5:12 PM set time. The Police, Bon Jovi, Alicia Keys, Kanye West, and yes, myself and my dumb face are all openers for the true headliner - the power to literally change the world's mind. The star of the night is an idea, and all eyes will be on it. And to that effect, I hope that Mr. Gore and the event organizers will keep in mind that for as much as we the artists represent their message, their message represents us.

Mr. Gore, for six hours, you have the collective ear of a generation. Tell the world how to change itself, and keep to the salient points - the big, unbroken potato chips at the top of the bag, so to speak. This is your big moment to show us all how easy it can be. Go with the "fly direct whenever possible" bit further down the road. Make the call to action feel like music makes us feel; that sometimes the only way to make it through the tough times in life is to bob your head to the groove and float it out. (That's hippie talk. The audience will get it, I promise.)

To the journalists who will lay in wait for the perfectly maligned moment of hypocrisy, you will probably find one if that's how you want to spend your time. Just use this as a measuring stick; give Live Earth's initiative at least as much benefit of the doubt as you've given to the iPhone, or a new Radiohead album.

Sure, if I wanted to be cynical, I could pose the question as to what happens if the biggest concert on Earth takes place only to hear the world respond with a resounding "that's nice, but have you seen the cat that plays piano on YouTube?" But all I feel going into Saturday afternoon is hope. And lots of it. After all, even the hardest moments in life have some hope hiding in there somewhere. And that's where the musicians come in. We deal in hope every day.

I look forward to seeing you all out at Giants Stadium. As a side note, I'll be signing autographs at the Roy Rogers restaurant at mile marker 112 in Secaucus.

This will work.

This blog was originally posted on www.johnmayer.com.