MEDIA

London Evening Standard Issues Correction After Mistakenly Calling Woman Prostitute

Copies of the London Evening Standard newspaper are pictured in central London, on January 21, 2009. Russian tycoon and forme
Copies of the London Evening Standard newspaper are pictured in central London, on January 21, 2009. Russian tycoon and former KGB agent Alexander Lebedev vowed Wednesday to back 'free and independent' journalism in London's Evening Standard after buying a majority stake in the struggling newspaper. Lebedev agreed to pay a nominal sum -- reportedly one pound -- to buy what he called the 'iconic' daily, which like other newspapers is battling amid radical upheaval in the industry in the face of the explosion of online news. AFP PHOTO/SHAUN CURRY (Photo credit should read SHAUN CURRY/AFP/Getty Images)

We can only imagine the shock that one woman experienced when she woke up to a newspaper inaccurately referring to her as a prostitute.

The London Evening Standard made the mistake in an article an exhibit on the late artist Sebastian Horsley. In a stunning mix-up, the newspaper called his former girlfriend Rachel Garley a "prostitute." The exhibit was called "The Whoresley Show."

The newspaper apologized for the mistake in a correction issued Monday, writing, "We accept that Ms Garley is not and has never been a prostitute. We offer our sincere apologies to Ms Garley for the damage to her reputation and the distress and embarrassment she has suffered as a result."

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