RELIGION

Malcolm X's Former Mosque Becomes Bastion Of Interfaith Work In Harlem

Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., left, of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and Malcolm X smile for photographers in
Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., left, of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and Malcolm X smile for photographers in Washington March 26, 1964. They shook hands after King announced plans for direct action protests if Southern senators filibuster against civil rights bill. Malcolm, who has broken with the Black Muslims, predicted another march on Washington if a filibuster against the civil rights bill drags on. (AP Photo/Henry Griffin)

Masjid Malcolm Shabazz has been a center of African-American Muslim life in Harlem since Malcolm X began preaching there in 1956.

But gone are the mosque's politics of Black Nationalism, its rule that white people aren't allowed inside and its legions of followers in suits and bow ties.

Today, the mosque—its green dome overlooks West 116th Street and Malcolm X Boulevard—is an interfaith pillar open to different races and religions.

Read more on online.wsj.com

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