Marjorie Taylor Greene Ripped For ‘Encouraging Violence’ With Anti-Vaccine Speech

An audience in Alabama cheered when the conspiracy-loving lawmaker praised their state for having one of the country's lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates.

Conspiracy theory-endorsing Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Ga.) faced backlash after she told an audience in Alabama that door-to-door outreach vaccination workers “might not like the welcome they get” because “in the South, we all love our Second Amendment rights,” reported Al.com.

Guests at an Alabama Federation of Republican Women event in Dothan cheered when the radical right-wing lawmaker praised their state for having one of the nation’s lowest vaccination rates, according to a video secretly recorded at the private July 23 event that radio host David Pakman shared on Twitter Tuesday.

“You lucky people in Alabama might get a knock on your door because I hear Alabama might be one of the most unvaccinated states in the nation,” Greene told the audience, eliciting cheers.

“Well, Joe Biden wants to come talk to you guys,” she continued, an apparent reference to the president’s door-to-door idea to encourage unvaccinated people to get the shot amid a new wave of infections.

Greene suggested Biden would send “one of his police state friends to your front door, to knock on the door, take down your name, your address, your family members’ names, your phone numbers, your cellphone numbers, probably ask for your Social Security number, and whether you’ve taken the vaccine or not.”

“Yeah, well, what they don’t know is in the South we all love our Second Amendment rights,” she added. “And we’re not real big on strangers showing up at our front door, are we? They might not like the welcome they get.”

Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Calif.) accused Greene of “encouraging violence” with her comments.

“FYI: It’s murder to shoot someone for knocking on your door,” Lieu tweeted.

Greene, a follower of the QAnon conspiracy theory and other crackpot ideology, has refused to disclose her vaccination status, falsely suggested vaccines aren’t necessary, likened vaccine mandates to “segregation” and compared House mask mandates to the Holocaust.