BLACK VOICES

America's Forgotten Mass Lynching: When 237 People Were Murdered In Arkansas

UNSPECIFIED - CIRCA 1939:  Member of the Ku Klux Klan with a noose, 75 cars of the Ku Klux Klan were driving through Miami, F
UNSPECIFIED - CIRCA 1939: Member of the Ku Klux Klan with a noose, 75 cars of the Ku Klux Klan were driving through Miami, Florida to hold off black people form the election, Photograph, May 11th 1939 (Photo by Imagno/Getty Images) [Mitglied des Ku-Klux-Klan mit einer Schlinge, 75 Autos des Ku-Klux-Klan fuhren durch Miami, Florida, um die farbige Bev?lkerung von einer Beteiligung an einer Wahl abzuhalten, Photographie, 11, Mai 1939]

The visits began in the fall of 1918, just as World War I ended. At his office in Little Rock, Arkansas, attorney Ulysses S. Bratton listened as African American sharecroppers from the Delta told stories of theft, exploitation, and endless debt. A man named Carter had tended 90 acres of cotton, only to have his landlord seize the entire crop and his possessions. From the town of Ratio, in Phillips County, Arkansas, a black farmer reported that a plantation manager refused to give sharecroppers an itemized account for their crop. Another sharecropper told of a landlord trying “to starve the people into selling the cotton at his own price. They ain’t allowing us down there room to move our feet except to go to the field.”

Read more on The Daily Beast