POLITICS

Giuliani's Loopy Voter Fraud Witness Says She's Running For Michigan House Seat

Mellissa Carone, who went viral for her bizarre and discredited testimony last month, now plans to run for a seat that may not exist after redistricting.

A Michigan woman who went viral for being Rudy Giuliani’s star witness during his attempt to overturn the state’s election results is considering running for office.

Mellissa Carone, whose bizarre and discredited testimony about voter fraud resulted in, among other things, a hilarious “Saturday Night Live” parody, now says she’s running for Michigan’s 46th House District in Oakland County, Deadline Detroit first reported.

Carone confirmed to HuffPost she plans to file to run this week. She told Deadline Detroit she planned to run on a platform of election integrity, even though she never provided evidence of the rampant fraud she claimed she observed at the TCF Center in Detroit in November.

“My ultimate goal is to get our ballots hand-counted and clean out Lansing just like draining the swamp in D.C. because that’s what we need,” she told the Detroit news outlet.

The publication noted that the next House elections aren’t until November 2022 and that the 33-year-old Carone doesn’t even live in the district where she plans to run.

Although Carone claims to have a home there in her name, some Michigan politicians suspect she didn’t do her due diligence before announcing her run.

Michigan state Sen. Curtis Hertel responded to the news by pointing out that the district Carone is planning to run in probably won’t exist once restricting is done per the 2020 census.

Carone insisted to HuffPost that the district will still exist two years from now.

“It’s been verified by numerous people,” she said, without providing specifics. “The question is quite silly.”

Hertel told HuffPost that a nonpartisan commission will be redistricting the population into non-gerrymandered districts.

“If she says she’ll run in any district, I guess it’s possible, but the district she says she’s running in could be wildly different, and as admitted, she doesn’t live there now,” he said.

Carone’s rise to internet infamy began after she was hired by a staffing agency to provide temporary assistance to Dominion Voting Systems, such as cleaning glass on voting machines, at the TCF Center in Detroit during the election.

Attorneys for the company said Carone did not have access to any insider information in her role at TCF, but that didn’t stop her from floating a conspiracy theory to right-wing outlets that vans containing food for election workers might have been secretly filled with ballots.

Although Giuliani repeated Carone’s claims on Fox News and Fox Business in the weeks after the Nov. 3 election, a Michigan judge said her accusations were “simply not credible.”

Dominion served Carone with a cease-and-desist letter over her misinformation campaign, and this week it sued Giuliani for $1.3 billion claiming defamation.

Since then, Carone has tried to make her mark with Donald Trump supporters by posing with the Proud Boys at an event in early December in Washington, D.C., and she was seen on the Capitol grounds during the Jan. 6 insurrection.