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No Labels = No Supporters

I predicted back in November that No Labels would fizzle, but it's remarkable to see the lack of interest. Despite widespread media coverage, the group has only managed to attract 18,697 signatures for its No Labels Declaration.
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I predicted back in November that No Labels would fizzle, but it's remarkable to see the lack of interest. Despite widespread media coverage and a December launch event that drew numerous high-profile politicians, the group has only managed to attract 18,697 signatures for its No Labels Declaration ("We are not labels -- we are people"). It's the same tepid response we saw to Unity '08 (124,000 members in twenty months) and Draft Bloomberg (11,600 signatures in six weeks) during the 2006-2008 period.

To put these results in perspective, here's how the No Labels, Unity '08, and Draft Bloomberg efforts compare to a petition asking the videogame company Blizzard Entertainment to include a LAN option in Starcraft 2, which reached 250,000 signatures in a little over a year*:

As you can see, No Labels is barely outpacing Draft Bloomberg, though it is doing better than Unity '08. All three, however, are dwarfed by the Starcraft 2 petition, which just underscores a point I've made many times before -- despite all the media hype, these groups have little popular support and almost no chance of changing the system.

* I constructed these lines using time-stamped blog posts by myself and others noting the number of signatures on each petition.

Cross-posted to HuffPost Pollster.

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