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How Does Being A Parent Change Your Politics?

Both Presidential candidates have been talking endlessly to parents this election cycle, but we parents have had far fewer chances to talk back.
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Landon Peterson peeks out of the voting booth while his mother Meghan votes March 20, 2012 at Christian union Church in Metamora, Illinois. White House hopeful Mitt Romney eyed a big win in President Barack Obama's home state Tuesday as he sought to clinch the Republican nomination and focus on November's general election. Polls across Illinois opened for the state primary at 6:00 am (1100 GMT) with former Massachusetts governor Romney the odds-on favorite to win.   AFP PHOTO/DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
Landon Peterson peeks out of the voting booth while his mother Meghan votes March 20, 2012 at Christian union Church in Metamora, Illinois. White House hopeful Mitt Romney eyed a big win in President Barack Obama's home state Tuesday as he sought to clinch the Republican nomination and focus on November's general election. Polls across Illinois opened for the state primary at 6:00 am (1100 GMT) with former Massachusetts governor Romney the odds-on favorite to win. AFP PHOTO/DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)

Both Presidential candidates have been talking endlessly to parents this election cycle, but we parents have had far fewer chances to talk back.

Now two publications -- parenting.com and parents.com -- have gone out and asked for our opinions, specifically looking at how having children shapes our political views.

Both polls found that the most important issues to parents are the economy, health care and education, although respondents were not asked which party's proposed solutions held most appeal.

There were also differences in the answers from one poll to the other. Among parenting.com readers, 42 percent say their children's lives will be better than their own, while parents.com readers are more optimistic, with 55 percent believing that.

You can read many of the rest of the results below. And use the comments to discuss perhaps the most intriguing of the poll questions: Have you changed your political views since becoming a parent?

Have YOU?

In what way?

Parenting and Politics