Peter Fonda Apologizes For 'Vulgar' Barron Trump Tweet

"I went way too far," said the "Easy Rider" actor, who got the attention of the Secret Service.

Actor Peter Fonda apologized Wednesday for a tweet that called for President Donald Trump’s 12-year-old son to be caged with pedophiles because of the Trump government’s immigration policies, news outlets reported.

The “Easy Rider” star acknowledged he “went way too far” with the message, which prompted first lady Melania Trump to contact the Secret Service and Donald Trump Jr. to challenge the 78-year-old actor to “pick on someone a bit bigger.”

“We should rip Barron Trump from his mother’s arms and put him in a cage with pedophiles and see if mother will stand up against the massive giant asshole she is married to,” Fonda wrote in capital letters in his tweet, which he later deleted.

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Twitter

“I tweeted something highly inappropriate and vulgar about the president and his family in response to the devastating images I was seeing on television,” Fonda said in a statement to USA Today. “Like many Americans, I am very impassioned and distraught over the situation with children separated from their families at the border, but I went way too far. It was wrong and I should not have done it. I immediately regretted it and sincerely apologize to the family for what I said and any hurt my words have caused.”

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Peter Fonda is in hot water for what he admitted was an "inappropriate" tweet about the president's 12-year-old son.
Jim Spellman via Getty Images

Melania Trump’s spokeswoman called the tweet “sick and irresponsible,” The Hill reported.

Barron’s half-brother Donald Trump Jr. challenged Fonda to bully someone bigger, and disparaged the actor’s sister, Jane Fonda.

Trump Jr. also joined an outcry calling for Sony Pictures to edit Fonda out of the new film “Boundaries,” which is opening in limited release on Friday. “I wonder if they will apply the same rules to @iamfonda that they did to @therealroseanne,” the president’s eldest son wrote on Twitter. 

Sony Pictures Classics called Fonda’s tweet “abhorrent, reckless and dangerous,” in a statement to Deadline, but said it wouldn’t pull or alter the film because Fonda has a “very minor role.” Such a change would penalize everyone who worked on the film, the company said.

The president on Wednesday signed an executive order reversing his administration’s policy of separating immigrant children from their parents at the border, but more than 2,300 kids have already been detained apart from their families.

Before You Go

Immigrant Families At The U.S.-Mexico Border
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Undocumented immigrants who turned themselves in after crossing the border from Mexico into the U.S. await processing near McAllen, Texas, on April 2, 2018. (credit: Loren Elliott / Reuters)
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Families who crossed the border near McAllen, Texas, on May 9, 2018. (credit: Loren Elliott / Reuters)
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A U.S. Border Patrol spotlight shines on a mother and son from Honduras on June 12, 2018, in McAllen, Texas. (credit: John Moore via Getty Images)
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Central Americans seeking asylum wait as U.S. Border Patrol agents take them into custody on June 12, 2018, near McAllen, Texas. (credit: John Moore via Getty Images)
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A Honduran mother stands with her family at the U.S.-Mexico border fence on Feb. 22, 2018, near Penitas, Texas. (credit: John Moore via Getty Images)
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U.S. Border Patrol agents take a Central American family into custody on June 12, 2018 near McAllen, Texas. (credit: John Moore via Getty Images)
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U.S. Border Patrol agents take a father and son from Honduras into custody near the U.S.-Mexico border on June 12, 2018, near Mission, Texas. (credit: John Moore via Getty Images)
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A Central American family waits to be taken into custody on June 12, 2018, near McAllen, Texas. (credit: John Moore via Getty Images)
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Central American migrants wait as U.S. Border Patrol agents take people into custody on June 12, 2018, near McAllen, Texas. (credit: John Moore via Getty Images)
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Two women and a child who crossed the border on Feb. 22, 2018, near McAllen, Texas. (credit: John Moore via Getty Images)
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A Honduran child who crossed the U.S.-Mexico border with her family on Jan. 4, 2017, near McAllen, Texas. (credit: John Moore via Getty Images)
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U.S. Border Patrol agents take Central American immigrants, including this young child, into custody on Jan. 4, 2017, near McAllen, Texas. (credit: John Moore via Getty Images)
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A Honduran woman and child on Jan. 4, 2017, near McAllen, Texas. (credit: John Moore via Getty Images)
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A U.S. Border Patrol agent checks birth certificates while taking Central American immigrants into detention on Jan. 4, 2017, near McAllen, Texas. (credit: John Moore via Getty Images)
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Adults and children await processing near McAllen, Texas, on April 2, 2018. (credit: Loren Elliott / Reuters)
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Guatemalan immigrant families turn themselves in to U.S. Border Patrol near McAllen, Texas, on May 8, 2018. (credit: Loren Elliott / Reuters)
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U.S. Border Patrol agents take Central American immigrants into custody on Jan. 4, 2017, near McAllen, Texas. (credit: John Moore via Getty Images)
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