Peter Robbins, The Voice Of Charlie Brown, Dies At Age 65

Robbins played the Peanuts character in cartoon classics such as "A Charlie Brown Christmas" and "It's The Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown."

Peter Robbins, who as a child voiced Charlie Brown in cartoon classics such as “A Charlie Brown Christmas” (1965) and “It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown” (1966), died last week.

Robbins died by suicide, his family told Fox 5 in San Diego. He was 65.

Robbins, born Louis G. Nanasi, was the first to play the lovably insecure lead character of the Peanuts gang created by cartoonist Charles Schulz, Deadline noted.

Peter Robbins, pictured with Charlie Brown in 2008, loved voicing the Peanuts character so much that he got a tattoo of Charlie Brown and Snoopy on his arm.
Peter Robbins, pictured with Charlie Brown in 2008, loved voicing the Peanuts character so much that he got a tattoo of Charlie Brown and Snoopy on his arm.
Valerie Macon via Getty Images

Robbins began voicing Charlie Brown at age 9 and stopped when he was 13, according to IMDB.

His other Charlie Brown works included “He’s Your Dog, Charlie Brown” (1967). His last voice gig for the character was in the 1969 feature film “A Boy Named Charlie Brown.”

Robbins loved the character so much he got a tattoo of Charlie Brown and Snoopy on his arm, Fox 5 reported.

He had a recurring part on the 1968-69 series “Blondie” and also collected credits on “Rawhide,” “The Munsters,” “The Donna Reed Show,” “F Troop,” “Get Smart” and “My Three Sons.”

His 1972 appearance on “My Three Sons” would be his final role at age 16, when he quit acting, The Wrap reported. He later worked as a DJ and in real estate.

Robbins, who suffered from bipolar disorder and fought addiction, completed a prison stint in 2019 after making criminal threats to law enforcement and others.

“I would recommend to anybody that has bipolar disorder to take it seriously because your life can turn around in the span of a month, like it did to me,” Robbins told Fox 5 previously. “I came out of prison and I’m a better person for it. I’m much more humble and grateful and thankful that I lived through the experience.”

If you or someone you know needs help, call 1-800-273-8255 for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. You can also text HOME to 741-741 for free, 24-hour support from the Crisis Text Line. Outside of the U.S., please visit the International Association for Suicide Prevention for a database of resources.

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