Poppy Bush, Trump and Other Random Fripperies

Who said each of the following...
(a) "I love the uneducated."
(b) "Persuasion has to target the emotions and speak to the less educated masses, not the intelligentsia"
(see answer below)
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We have all-news, all-sports, all-weather channels, isn't it time for Chase-TV, a 24/7 channel with nothing but police car chases from around the world? These live pursuits seem to be riveting. Local channels often preempt daytime programming to carry the latest freeway - or if you're from the east - highway action. History may record that Chase-TV had its origins in the late 20th century when millions watched O.J. Simpson's Ford Bronco slow-chased by a fleet of Los Angeles police. What made it riveting was the dramatic murder story behind it. Therefore, Chase-TV's reality producers will have to create really exciting murder, madness and mayhem scenarios with pulsating music and major intersections coming up as cliff hangers for the commercial break.
Oh, and you could have celebrity pursuers. And by 'celebrity' we keep the budget down with the usual 'C' list celebs from shows like The Housewives of Pacoima. Are you listening Comcast?
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Things that are no longer mainstream:
"Dig" as in "Dig the action," or "Dig this." Dig was like saying 'look' or 'understand' as in '"Can you dig it, man?" Dig did not make the cut to current-speak and man is now dude which to silent and baby boomer generations is a bummer - which is also not heard amongst day's Boomlets. They seem to prefer, 'It sucks.'
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The tantalizing end of many a TV show is called a 'cliff-hanger.' In psychotherapy, a cliffhanger is called a 'doorknob' moment which is when the client reveals a major emotional issue whilst out the door.
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More Things That Are No Longer Here
"Spring has Sprung,
Grass has Riz,
Where Last Year's Careless Driver Is
"
If this sounds familiar then you are of a certain age who drove across the country, reading the small, four-to-six consecutive road-side signs with this and other rhymes for Burma Shave. From the 1930s to 1963, Burma Shave was the second-highest selling brushless shaving cream in the country. No one seems to know why the small southeast nation of Burma was a unique selling proposition for shaving. Which is maybe why Gillette stiffed the Burma brand and all their signs because they couldn't see the connection either - or the country of Burma became Myanmar which is one syllable too much. Note: the Burma Shave signs disappeared at the same time the new- fangled wonder-thing called television sprouted peculiar bunny-eared, telescoping set-top antennas - which are also no longer here.
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Highly recommended: Pulitzer winner Jon Meacham's Destiny and Power: The American Odyssey of George Herbert Walker Bush.This absorbing and comprehensive Random House book does for H.W. Bush what Merle Miller did for Harry Truman in Plain Speaking - turning a dismissed president into a leader. Meacham had unprecedented access to the president's daily diary. It seems Bush, himself, diminishes his presidency calling himself a forgotten figure, a one-term president over shadowed by the myth of his predecessor and the drama of his sons' political lives."I feel like an asterisk," he says. Not so. The take-away here is H.W. was the right president at the right time: the break-up of the Soviet empire and the American military intervention that turned back Saddam Hussain's invasion of Kuwait. It's hard to imagine a President Trump in the same situations.
Another take-away is Poppy Bush was an intense competitor, adept at governance and rather inept at politics. He delivered a campaign pledge, he knew he couldn't keep when he promised: "No new taxes, read My Lips." - which was the choice of the competitor not the adept guy.
Audiobook narration is a specific skill not all actors can master. Paul Michael's rich and well balanced narration in this book delivers sure access to the sometimes complex mechanics of running a country. (25 hrs, 10 minutes)
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"The first duty of a free press is to make a profit."
Col. Robert McCormick, publisher,
Chicago Tribune
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ANSWER TO WHO SAID THIS
Donald Trump
Adolf Hitler