Producer Nina Jacobson on Hunger Games Memories and Peeta's Pants-Splitting Moment

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Answers by Nina Jacobson, Film and TV Producer, Producer of The Hunger Games movie franchise:

A: We had so many laughs and great times making these movies that it's hard to find just one. We loved shooting on location together as a group. We would go out a lot and enjoy food and music in Atlanta, Hawaii, Paris and Berlin. We had a bunch of major laugh out loud moments on set. When Peeta proposed to Katniss in Catching Fire on Ceasar Flickerman's show, he dropped to one knee and split his pants while we were filming. That was classic. But, I also just loved the day to day of the experience. Sitting with Francis every day, watching dailies (playback of film that we shot the day before), talking about the movie we were making. I loved the script meetings with Suzanne Collins whenever we would have a major breakthrough. I just felt so lucky to be making these movies that I enjoyed a lot of the everyday moments as much as the big highs.

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A: The biggest reason is that actors and actresses fees are determined based on their previous quotes.  So, if an actor has gotten his fee up over the years by proving his value in the marketplace, especially internationally, he will have quotes that influence what he makes on his next gig.  Because there have been fewer opportunities for women to prove their value in the kinds of movies that make big money around the world, they don't have the precedent and that holds them back.  The way to change it is to make more successful movies with female protagonists.  I think people in Hollywood are finally getting the memo that there is a ton of upside in great stories starring women.  The more of those movies we make, the more we can drive actresses fees up.  I also think that Jen Lawrence's essay points out another side to the issue, which is that women are often more worried about looking like brats than their male counterparts. We have to worry about that less, if not for ourselves, then for our daughters so that parity becomes the expectation.

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A: I think that the conversation about parity for women has finally come out of the shadows.  Increasingly, women in positions of influence are becoming bolder in speaking up, less fearful that they take on the subject, they will look "high maintenance."

I think that the conversation about parity for women has finally come out of the shadows.  Increasingly, women in positions of influence are becoming bolder in speaking up, less fearful that if they take on the subject, they will look "high maintenance."

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