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What's The Breaking Point That Drove You To Quit A Job? Share Your Story.

HuffPost is collecting stories about the last straws that drove people to quit a job. Help us by sharing yours.
HuffPost wants to hear stories about why workers quit a job.
HuffPost wants to hear stories about why workers quit a job.

What drives good employees to reach a breaking point and quit their jobs?

In a 2017 CareerBuilder survey of 3,697 U.S. employees, two-thirds said they took a job only to realize it was a bad fit. The top reasons they gave for this bad fit were a toxic work culture (46 percent), a boss’s management style (40 percent), a job didn’t match its description (37 percent) and a lack of clear expectations about the job (33 percent). Half of those employees ended up quitting within six months.

Quitting is a final decision that many of us make: 3.5 million people quit their jobs this January, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported. But the stats don’t say why. Quitting can be a positive sign of your confidence in finding a better job. Or it can be a bitter last response to a series of increasingly intolerable events in your workplace.

Your boss or human resources department may never know the full story of why you quit, but HuffPost wants to know more about the final straw that made you say, “I have to get out of here.” It can be inspiring and heartening to know that there are other employees who have been in the same position, stuck and wanting to get out, and then did something about it.

Help us continue our reporting by sharing the story of the moment you knew you needed to quit your job. Email your comments to me at monica.torres@huffpost.com. All or part of your story may be used in an article.

1. Please share the breaking point at your job that drove you to quit. At what moment did the decision crystalize in your mind?

2. Why did this factor push you to leave the job?

3. What kind of job was it? (If you do not feel comfortable disclosing specifics, please share other general details, such as role and industry.)