Rand Paul Files Disclosure 16 Months Late Showing Wife Invested In Remdesivir Maker

Kelley Paul lost money on the investment in Gilead Sciences, which makes an antiviral drug used to treat COVID-19, a spokesperson said.

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) disclosed Wednesday that his wife bought stock in Gilead Sciences, which makes an antiviral drug used to treat COVID-19, just weeks before the full threat of the coronavirus pandemic came to public light.

Paul filed paperwork to show that his wife, Kelley Paul, invested in Gilead in February 2020, according to The Washington Post. The pharmaceutical company makes remdesivir, an antiviral drug given to former President Donald Trump when he was sick with COVID-19 in October.

Paul is a member of the Senate health committee, which began receiving briefings on COVID-19 in January 2020, the month before his wife’s investment.

Paul filed the disclosure 16 months after the deadline mandated by the Stock Act, which requires lawmakers to report such details within 45 days to curb trading on information not available to the public.

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) disclosed Wednesday that his wife bought stock in Gilead Sciences, a company that makes an antiviral drug used to treat the coronavirus, in February 2020. His disclosure was 16 months late.
Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) disclosed Wednesday that his wife bought stock in Gilead Sciences, a company that makes an antiviral drug used to treat the coronavirus, in February 2020. His disclosure was 16 months late.
Bill Clark via Getty Images

Kelsey Cooper, a spokesperson for the senator, told the Post that Paul filled out the disclosure form for his wife last year, but determined recently that it hadn’t been transmitted. Paul spoke with the Senate Ethics Committee about the error and filed a supplemental report on Wednesday.

Kelley Paul lost money on the investment, valued between $1,000 and $15,000, Cooper added.

“In the process of preparing to file his annual financial disclosure for last year, he learned that the form was not transmitted and promptly alerted the filing office and requested their guidance. In accordance with that guidance, he filed both reports today,” Cooper told CNN.

Paul became the first U.S. senator to test positive for the virus in March 2020. Since then, he has been a vocal critic of government public health precautions during the pandemic and has refused to receive a COVID-19 vaccination.

This week, YouTube suspended his account for spreading misinformation about wearing masks.