Here's Why We're Optimistic About The American Classroom

Amy Lawson, a fifth-grade teacher at Silver Lake Elementary School in Middletown, Del., teaches an English language arts lesson Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2013. The school has begun implementing the national Common Core State Standards for academics. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)
Amy Lawson, a fifth-grade teacher at Silver Lake Elementary School in Middletown, Del., teaches an English language arts lesson Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2013. The school has begun implementing the national Common Core State Standards for academics. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)

Most teachers have some pretty selfless and inspiring reasons for going into education.

A new survey released this week by Scholastic and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation asked more than 20,000 teachers various questions about their feelings on their job, including why they were motivated to become teachers. Most respondents gave answers that make us feel optimistic about American classrooms.

According to the survey, an overwhelming majority of teachers said their top reasons for going into education were "to make a difference in children's lives," "to share my love of learning and teaching" and "to help students reach their full potential." Barely any said they went into teaching "for the earning potential" or for "no particular reason."

Here's a full breakdown of how teachers responded to the survey questions:

teachers reasons

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