Reporter Allows GOP to Slide on Ticket Controversy

Republicans continue to blame CNBC outright, or imply that CNBC is responsible for severely limiting the number of seats available for today's GOP presidential debate, when, in fact, all signs point to the Republicans as the ones who made the decision to fill only about 1,000 of the 11,000-seat arena at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

"The way it was explained to us was, the event was meant for a TV audience, not so much live audience,"  the Colorado Republican Committee's Brian Lynch told Colorado Public Radio's Rachel Estabrook, for a piece that aired nationally last night.

Explained to us? By whom?

Lynch doesn't say, and there's no indication Estabrook asked him.

We know from a university spokesman that CNBC set the number of seats that could be filled for the event, and the Republicans were in charge of distributing tickets.

What we still don't know is, how many seats Republicans had to give away. CNBC "did not respond to interview requests" from Estabrook.

But logic says, CNBC would subtract the number of seats needed for its equipment and personnel--and let the GOP have the remainder of the tickets. Why not? I mean, Republicans rented the Coors Events Center.

But, in any case, what's crazy is, journalists are letting Republicans deflect criticism that Republicans should let more students in--without clarifying who's, in fact, responsible.

If you listen to NPR's story last night, you're left thinking CNBC is responsible, especially becuase it's not commenting.

The question remains, how many tickets did CNBC make available to Republicans for distribution? And why is CNBC mum as Republicans blame it?