Sports Illustrated Reporter Robert Klemko Live Tweets His Ferguson Arrest

Sports Illustrated Reporter Live Tweets Arrest
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FERGUSON, MO - AUGUST 17: Police advance on demonstrators protesting the killing of teenager Michael Brown on August 17, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri. Police shot smoke and tear gas into the crowd of several hundred as they advanced near the police command center which has been set up in a shopping mall parking lot. Brown was shot and killed by a Ferguson police officer on August 9. Despite the Brown family's continued call for peaceful demonstrations, violent protests have erupted nearly every night in Ferguson since his death. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
FERGUSON, MO - AUGUST 17: Police advance on demonstrators protesting the killing of teenager Michael Brown on August 17, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri. Police shot smoke and tear gas into the crowd of several hundred as they advanced near the police command center which has been set up in a shopping mall parking lot. Brown was shot and killed by a Ferguson police officer on August 9. Despite the Brown family's continued call for peaceful demonstrations, violent protests have erupted nearly every night in Ferguson since his death. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Three journalists covering the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri, were arrested Sunday night.

Missouri Highway Patrol Capt. Ron Johnson ordered the arrests of Financial Times reporter Neil Munshi, Telegraph foreign correspondent Rob Crilly and Sports Illustrated writer Robert Klemko, according to The Washington Post.

Klemko took to Twitter to capture the chaotic scene, live tweeting his temporary detainment:

Last week, The Huffington Post's own Ryan J. Reilly was arrested in a Ferguson McDonald's while he was covering events in the city. Reilly described the incident as a "dehumanizing process."

Tensions have erupted between police and demonstrators after the Aug. 9 death of local teen Michael Brown, who was shot at least six times by police officer Darren Wilson. Capt. Johnson took command over security operations in Ferguson on Aug. 14 in the hopes of quelling clashes between police and demonstrators, as well as journalists covering the conflict. Johnson ordered away SWAT trucks with sniper posts and even marched with demonstrators. However, unrest on the streets had resumed by the weekend.

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