Travel

Ryanair Plane Rolls Backward, Slams Into Building At Roman Airport

An airplane of the Irish low-cost airline Ryanair takes off from Barcelona's airport on September 01, 2010. Irish low-cost airline Ryanair said it had overtaken Spanish flag carrier Iberia as the largest airline in Spain in terms of the number of passengers carried. The company quoted official statistics from Spain's airport authority AENA showing that Ryanair in July transported 2.98 million passengers to or from  Spain, compared to 2.77 million for Iberia. AFP PHOTO / JOSEP LAGO (Photo credit should read JOSEP LAGO/AFP/Getty Images)
An airplane of the Irish low-cost airline Ryanair takes off from Barcelona's airport on September 01, 2010. Irish low-cost airline Ryanair said it had overtaken Spanish flag carrier Iberia as the largest airline in Spain in terms of the number of passengers carried. The company quoted official statistics from Spain's airport authority AENA showing that Ryanair in July transported 2.98 million passengers to or from Spain, compared to 2.77 million for Iberia. AFP PHOTO / JOSEP LAGO (Photo credit should read JOSEP LAGO/AFP/Getty Images)

It's been a year of ups and downs -- or takeoffs and landings, shall we say -- for Ryanair planes: First, their new baggage policy backfired. Then, they promised $10 flights... but with extra fees. And the situation with the grieving father? Not their finest moment.

But all was topped when a Ryanair plane rolled backward on the tarmac and slammed into a fire station at Rome's Ciampino Airport on Wednesday.

"It was surreal to watch," a bystander told the Daily Mail. "'It's a good (thing) no one was standing by... the plane would have slammed into them."

The Boeing 737 wasn't properly secured on the tarmac, officials say. The plane's 40-meter roll left it with a broken tail wing and thousands of dollars in damage. Passengers had already disembarked.

"Ryanair has asked the ground handling agent (Groundcare) to investigate why it failed to properly secure a Ryanair aircraft," an airline spokesperson told the Huffington Post in a written statement. "...the aircraft will shortly return to service."

If your next budget flight has a bruised tail, you'll know why.

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