QUEER VOICES

San Francisco 49ers Slam North Carolina's Anti-Queer Law

The team also donated $75,000 to Equality North Carolina. Score!
"HB2 does not reflect the values of our organization, of our country, or the majority of North Carolinians," 49ers CEO Jed Yo
"HB2 does not reflect the values of our organization, of our country, or the majority of North Carolinians," 49ers CEO Jed York said.

The San Francisco 49ers just scored a touchdown for the queer community in North Carolina. 

The football organization has joined the long and continually growing list of sports groups, businesses, politicians, celebrities and others who are calling for the repeal of North Carolina's House Bill 2 (HB2).

"The San Francisco 49ers are deeply concerned about North Carolina’s recently-enacted House Bill 2, which overturned protections for LGBT people and sanctioned discrimination across the state," 49ers CEO Jed York said in a statement released on Tuesday. "HB2 does not reflect the values of our organization, of our country, or the majority of North Carolinians," he added.

York urged North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory, who signed HB2 into law in late March, and the "leadership of North Carolina's legislature to repeal this law in the current legislative session." The football team also donated $75,000 to North Carolina's largest queer advocacy group, Equality North Carolina.

HB2 prohibits cities in North Carolina from passing non-discriminations laws to protect queer people. It also prohibits trans people from using public restrooms that correspond with their gender identity.

In the two months since the controversial bill was signed into law, the state has reportedly lost millions in revenue and thousands of jobs. A recent report from the Charlotte Chamber states that Mecklenburg County, where Charlotte, North Carolina, is located, "has suffered an economic blow of $285 million and a loss of as many as 1,300 jobs as a result of HB2." What's worse, a study by the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law found that HB2 could cost North Carolina up to $5 billion a year if it isn't repealed.

Correction: An earlier version of this story misidentified the first name of North Carolina's governor. This has been corrected.

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