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You Won't Believe What Airplane Food Looked Like In The '60s

These are NOT your average peanuts.

By now, we're fairly used to airplane food looking like sludge and/or goo, sprinkled with unidentified foreign objects and maybe, if you're lucky, a free bag of legumes or two.

But OH, what it used to be.

Images surfaced online last week from the cabin of a Scandinavian Airlines plane in 1968, where passengers noshed on a literal smörgåsbord of delicious items mid-flight:

An "air hostess" serves what the airline calls its "Scandinavian country-style buffet," 1968.
An "air hostess" serves what the airline calls its "Scandinavian country-style buffet," 1968.
Is that <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/12/05/charcuterie-plate_n_6251150.html">charcuterie</a>? On a plane?! Yes, yes it is.
Is that charcuterie? On a plane?! Yes, yes it is.
Scandinavian Airlines was the first carrier&nbsp;to <a href="https://www.flysas.com/upload/International/SKI/Media-center/Mediakit/Oct09/SAS%20innovations.pdf" target="_blank">cross directly over the North Pole</a> in 1953. We're guessing their onboard food offerings were&nbsp;just as impressive to customers.
Scandinavian Airlines was the first carrier to cross directly over the North Pole in 1953. We're guessing their onboard food offerings were just as impressive to customers.
A "steward" slices&nbsp;meat for passengers. Now THAT'S in-flight entertainment.
A "steward" slices meat for passengers. Now THAT'S in-flight entertainment.

These images are indeed "from actual flights," a spokesperson from Scandinavian Airlines told HuffPost. They were re-released to celebrate the airline's 70th birthday this year.

Their commemorative website rounds up tales from former passengers, who recall a glamorous age in which everyone wore their Sunday best to board a plane and flight attendants sang real-life lullabies. On other carriers, lobster was a common main dish (with real silverware!), and free booze became the norm.

Of course, flying is a little less fabulous these days. Here's hoping history repeats itself very soon.

Happy travels!

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