On July 11, 2015, the Grandby/Grand County Airport (Colorado) was dedicated as the Emily Warner Field in recognition of the groundbreaking accomplishments of National Women's Hall of Fame Inductee Emily Howell Warner.
|
This post was published on the now-closed HuffPost Contributor platform. Contributors control their own work and posted freely to our site. If you need to flag this entry as abusive, send us an email.

On July 11, 2015, the Grandby/Grand County Airport (Colorado) was dedicated as the Emily Warner Field in recognition of the groundbreaking accomplishments of National Women's Hall of Fame Inductee Emily Howell Warner. The aviation world was not very welcoming to women over much of its history, but women were determined to fly in spite of the adversities they encountered. Match the woman with her accomplishment.

____ 1. The first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean.
____ 2. The first African-American to earn an international pilot's license in 1921.
____ 3. The first female commercial airline pilot.
____ 4. The first woman pilot who passed all of the tests undertaken by the first group of astronauts, but not accepted into the astronaut corps because she was a woman.
____ 5. Co-founder of the Ninety-Nines and second woman pilot licensed in the U.S.

A. Bessie Coleman
B. Amelia Earhart
C. Jerrie Cobb
D. Emily Howell Warner
E. Ruth Nichols

The first African-American female pilot, Bessie Coleman had to go to Paris to earn her pilot's license (1921) which also resulted in her being the first African-American of either gender to receive an international pilot's license. A fearless stunt flyer and aerial acrobat, Coleman performed in air shows around the U.S., breaking many color barriers. Her dream of establishing a flying school to teach African-Americans to fly did not become a reality due to her tragic death in an aviation accident in 1926. Featured on a U.S. postage stamp, Coleman has been inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame.

Aviation pioneer Ruth Nichols became the second licensed woman pilot in the U.S. in 1924. A daredevil and stunt pilot, Nichols also has a long list of firsts: first woman licensed seaplane pilot, first to fly non-stop from New York to Miami, first woman to land in all 48 contiguous United States, co-founder of the "Ninety-Nines," first woman to hold three international speed records (speed, altitude and long distance), and a pilot who flew faster than any other woman in 1958. After Amelia Earhart became the first woman to fly across the Atlantic, Nichols became involved in the business of aviation serving as the first female director of a major aviation company.

Like Ruth Nichols, a true aviation pioneer, Amelia Earhart is most well known for being the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean (1932), and then later, tragically, disappearing while trying to fly around the world (1937). The 16th woman to earn a pilot's license, Earhart worked many odd jobs to earn the money to pay for flying school. After crossing the Atlantic, she became the first person to fly solo across the Pacific (from California to Hawaii). Active in the Ninety-Nines and its first president, Earhart has been inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame.

The first woman to undergo the same testing as the men who were selected to be the first astronauts, Jerrie Cobb passed those tests with flying colors. However, in spite of her success - and the success of twelve other women in passing those same tests - women would not be admitted to the astronaut corps until 1978, almost 20 years later. A woman for whom flying had been her life since she was twelve, Cobb later was selected by NASA as a consultant to the space program. Determined to use her skills to better the world, for 35 years Cobb has delivered materials and supplies to people in the Amazonian jungles. She has received many awards for her humanitarian services.

Credited as the first female commercial airline pilot, Emily Howell Warner has a long list of firsts for women in aviation: first woman member of the Air Line Pilots Association, first leader of an all-female Continental Airlines crew, first woman captain, among others. In 1957, she became entranced by flying. Paying for her flying lessons, she noted that the men who were learning to fly were being hired for jobs piloting commercial jets and she decided to do so as well. After six years of applying, Frontier Airlines hired her. Over the course of her career, she flew for Frontier, Continental, and United Parcel Service. Warner has received many honors and has been inducted into the Colorado Women's Hall of Fame and the National Women's Hall of Fame.

Learn about more she-roes and celebrate amazing women. Most of these pilots are profiled in the book Her Story: A Timeline of the Women Who Changed America. We benefit from their trailblazing efforts and salute their accomplishments.

(answers: 1-B, 2-A, 3-D, 4-C, 5-E)

Before You Go

Popular in the Community