RELIGION

South Carolina Churches Are Doing More Than Praying For Flood Victims

Religious groups are collecting donations, delivering supplies and mobilizing volunteers.
Two men row a boat on a flooded street in downtown Charleston, South Carolina on October 4, 2015.
Two men row a boat on a flooded street in downtown Charleston, South Carolina on October 4, 2015.

Flooding in South Carolina has reached "historic proportions," according to Gov. Nikki Haley, with at least 17 dead and damage yet to be calculated.

Churches have risen to provide essential support for those affected, according to Vocativ, an online publisher that used geo-location technology to assess social media posts from areas hardest hit by the flooding,

NewSpring Church, which has 10 locations throughout the state, has launched a massive effort tagged #FloodSCWithLove to provide aid to families affected by the disaster.

"So many people have been affected by flooding this week and we have an opportunity to come together with people in our communities and serve one another by meeting very real, tangible needs in our state," said Suzanne Swift, NewSpring's public relations director.

Using its Columbia campus as its distribution base, the church has delivered truckloads of supplies, including water, non-perishable food items and blankets, to local shelters.

First truck loaded up and headed out to #FloodSCWithLove!

A photo posted by NewSpring Church (@newspring_church) on

NewSpring's senior pastor, Perry Noble, posted a video to his Instagram account showing the dire situation:

"We know in the coming days there will be much work to be done to clean up and restore our state," Swift told The Huffington Post. Those interested in volunteering for relief efforts can sign up at FloodSCWithLove.com to get connected with local organizations offering aid, she added.

Bishop Robert Guglielmone, leader of the Roman Catholic Church in Charleston, urged pastors to take up special collections in their churches for parishioners who lost their homes and for churches that have been damaged.

Sisters of Essence, which describes itself as a religious organization, put a call out for clothing donations on social media. On Tuesday, volunteers from the group delivered donations to a local high school running a temporary shelter for flood victims.

Today was a rewarding and humbling experience for SOE. Giving back to our community is what we are here to do. As a...

Posted by Sisters of Essence #777 on Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Churches outside of South Carolina are working to bring relief to the flooded state, as well. Ignite Church in North Carolina is hosting a donations drive on Sunday to gather bottled water and non-perishable foods for their neighbors in South Carolina. The church hopes to fill an 18-wheel tractor-trailer with supplies to deliver on Monday.

Mt. Bethel United Methodist Church in Marietta, Georgia, is sending a team to work with churches in South Carolina and assess the community's needs. The congregation is accepting financial donations that will go toward the South Carolina Flood Relief, as well as water donations.

 

Also on HuffPost:

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    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    A man makes his way through floodwaters in the parking lot of the Citadel Beach Club on Isle of Palms, South Carolina, on Monday. Charleston and the surrounding areas are still struggling with floodwaters due to a slow-moving storm system.
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    Sean Rayford via Getty Images
    Possessions are stacked in second-floor apartments during heavy flooding in Columbia, South Carolina.
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    Charlene Stennis is escorted to safety after her son was rescued from a stranded vehicle on a flooded roadway in Columbia, South Carolina.
  • A pickup truck rests against the side of Gills Creek near a bridge in Columbia, South Carolina, on Monday.
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    A pickup truck rests against the side of Gills Creek near a bridge in Columbia, South Carolina, on Monday.
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    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    A home in floodwaters on Sullivan's Island, South Carolina.
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    Floodwaters rise around a title loan store on Garners Ferry Road in Columbia, South Carolina.
  • Floodwaters rise around a title loan store on Garners Ferry Road in Columbia, South Carolina.
    Sean Rayford via Getty Images
    Floodwaters rise around a title loan store on Garners Ferry Road in Columbia, South Carolina.
  • Flood-displaced residents listen to the news at a temporary shelter at St. Andrews Middle School in Columbia, South Carolina.
    MLADEN ANTONOV via Getty Images
    Flood-displaced residents listen to the news at a temporary shelter at St. Andrews Middle School in Columbia, South Carolina.
  • A dog runs on a flooded street in downtown Charleston, South Carolina, on Sunday.
    MLADEN ANTONOV via Getty Images
    A dog runs on a flooded street in downtown Charleston, South Carolina, on Sunday.
  • Farrell Rose and his fiancee, Damita Trapp, look away after floodwaters surrounded their home in Columbia, South Carolina.
    Sean Rayford via Getty Images
    Farrell Rose and his fiancee, Damita Trapp, look away after floodwaters surrounded their home in Columbia, South Carolina.
  • A group of college students play along the flooded streets of Charleston, South Carolina.
    Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
    A group of college students play along the flooded streets of Charleston, South Carolina.
  • Matt Howard puts down some sandbags in hopes of reducing the damage to his girlfriend's home in the St. Andrews area of
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    Matt Howard puts down some sandbags in hopes of reducing the damage to his girlfriend's home in the St. Andrews area of Columbia, South Carolina.
  • Floodwaters rush through the breach of the Columbia Canal as emergency workers prepare giant sandbags to plug the hole.
    Sean Rayford via Getty Images
    Floodwaters rush through the breach of the Columbia Canal as emergency workers prepare giant sandbags to plug the hole.
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