State Senator Declines to Sign Fake News Pledge, Saying Term Fake News "Smacks of a New Censorship"

You'd think twice about signing some pledges, if you're a politician.

But a pledge not to spread fake news, if it's found to be false by "Snopes, Politifact, Factcheck.org, or by a respected news outlet?"  And to remove such falsehoods accidentally posted on Facebook unless "detailed reasons for not deleting" them are provided.

That's kind of like saying, I promise to tell the truth, as I see it, to the best of my ability.

So why wouldn't everyone sign such the pledge? Alas, Sen. Kevin Lundberg (R-Berthoud) has rejected the fake news pledge, stating in an email to me:

Lundberg: I have always been as careful as I can in not promoting inaccurate information. However, there is a troubling element to the idea that news out of the mainstream might be suspected of being "fake."

Having been a legislator for many years, and at one time a member of the news media, I know that every story is laced with the assumptions and perspective of the reporter. Hence, almost all stories have elements of what somebody might want to brand as "fake." This is the reality of news reporting and the consumer of this information should always be discerning.

This new term "fake news," to me smacks of a new censorship that ultimately could do more damage than what inaccurate news could ever do on its own.

I will respectfully decline to sign your pledge.

Kevin Lundberg
Colorado State Senate

I disagree with Lundberg, because the fake news pledge, developed in response to Colorado lawmakers who spread fake news last year, specifically allows him to post "out of the mainstream" news on his Facebook page, even if mainstream news outlets find it to be false. All he has to do is defend it.

And if spotlighting the term "fake news" "smacks of a new censorship" and risks causing more damage than inaccurate news is currently causing, than how can we challenge misinformation? What terms can we use to talk about falsehoods without being accused of censorship?

But I do appreciate Lundberg taking time to explain his position on the fake-news-pledge to me. It's a step toward creating the civil, factual discourse that the pledge seeks to nurture.

Still, lawmakers who disagree with Lundberg can sign the pledge here. Citizens sign here.