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Turns out the Republicans were against raising the deficit until they were for it -- at least when it comes to extending the Bush tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans (a move that comes with a budget price tag of $700 billion over the next decade). Whenever they are asked to explain the contradiction, the suddenly-plucked deficit hawks -- led by John Boehner -- fall back on the canard that if the Bush cuts are allowed to expire, more jobs will be lost. This reveals a total lack of understanding about how jobs are -- and aren't -- created. Hint: it has nothing to do with the personal tax rate of the people running the business. It has everything to do with demand -- from consumers, advertisers, government contracts, etc. When businesses have more demand, they hire more people. Simple. Maybe Boehner can skip a few rounds of golf and take an Economics 101 class.
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Turns out the Republicans were against raising the deficit until they were for it -- at least when it comes to extending the Bush tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans (a move that comes with a budget price tag of $700 billion over the next decade). Whenever they are asked to explain the contradiction, the suddenly-plucked deficit hawks -- led by John Boehner -- fall back on the canard that if the Bush cuts are allowed to expire, more jobs will be lost. This reveals a total lack of understanding about how jobs are -- and aren't -- created. Hint: it has nothing to do with the personal tax rate of the people running the business. It has everything to do with demand -- from consumers, advertisers, government contracts, etc. When businesses have more demand, they hire more people. Simple. Maybe Boehner can skip a few rounds of golf and take an Economics 101 class.

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