POLITICS

Supreme Court Rules Against Woman Challenging Husband's Visa Denial

FILE - This June 30, 2014 file photo shows the Supreme Court in Washington. Supreme Court justices found more common ground t
FILE - This June 30, 2014 file photo shows the Supreme Court in Washington. Supreme Court justices found more common ground than usual this year, and nowhere was their unanimity more surprising than in ruling that police must get a judge's approval before searching cellphones of people they've arrested. But the conservative-liberal divide was still evident in other cases, including this week's ruling on religion, birth control and the health care law. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

WASHINGTON, June 15 (Reuters) - The Supreme Court on Monday ruled against a U.S. citizen who objected to the U.S. government's denial of a visa for her Afghan husband.

The court ruled on a 5-4 vote against Fauzia Din, a naturalized American citizen from Afghanistan, by throwing out an appeals court ruling in her favor. Din, who lives in Fremont, California, sued the U.S. government after her husband, Afghan citizen Kanishka Berashk, was denied a visa in 2009.

The U.S. government cited a law that allows consular officials wide discretion to deny visas to those linked with "terrorist activities." The government said it is not required to provide any more details.

(Reporting by Lawrence Hurley; Editing by Will Dunham)

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