ENTERTAINMENT

Susan Boyle Involved In TWO Foul-Mouthed Outburst, Threatened To Quit (VIDEO)

On the heels of reports that YouTube star Susan Boyle had two foul-mouthed outbursts on the same day, "Britain's Got Talent Judge" Piers Morgan went on American television Thursday morning saying she threatened to quit the show because of the pressure, which she has been favored to win.

The Daily Mail reports Boyle was angered watching Morgan compliment another performer on television:

The Scottish singer is said to have began swearing angrily after Morgan told told 12-year-old Shaheen Jafargholi his had been 'the best singing performance we have heard in the semi-finals so far'.

Watching the show the hotel's bar, Boyle is accused of sticking two fingers up at a television and shouting 'f*** off', before stomping off to her room.

The BGT finalist was involved in an earlier foul-mouthed outburst outside the Wembley Plaza Hotel. Boyle's spokesman said she lost her temper after being 'wound up' by two strangers. Photographs of the singer show her involved in a heated discussion with police officers outside the hotel.

Boyle's spokesperson spoke to the AP:

The spokeswoman said the golden-voiced and fluffy-haired singer, who became an overnight sensation after appearing on the show, was left distressed after being taunted by two reporters at the Wembley Plaza Hotel on Wednesday.

"Two journalists were harassing her and pushed her (Boyle) over the edge. She was left slightly distressed and the journalists were removed from the building by police," the spokeswoman said on condition of anonymity because she represents all of the contestants on the show.

The spokeswoman gave no further details of how Boyle was harassed or what she said.

On CBS Wednesday morning Morgan told "The Early Show" he was sympathetic to her new found fame.

"From what I hear, she's been in tears the last two days. She even threatened to leave the show yesterday at one stage because of the sheer amount of pressure on her," Morgan told Maggie Rodriguez.

"And you've got to -- you have to remember with Susan, she's a 48-year-old lady from a tiny village in Scotland who has never been exposed to anything like this kind of attention. And I think she's really feeling the heat."

WATCH, OR SCROLL FOR FULL TRANSCRIPT:

TRANSCRIPT:
MAGGIE RODRIGUEZ, CO-ANCHOR: One of Susan Boyle's most ardent supporters, one of the judges on "Britain's Got Talent," our good friend Piers Morgan. Good morning, Piers.

PIERS MORGAN, JUDGE, "BRITAIN'S GOT TALENT": Good morning.

RODRIGUEZ: Are you still supporting her this morning? Or do you think now that she's famous she should know better than to do this sort of thing?

MORGAN: I'm actually feeling more supportive today than I was before because I feel really sorry for Susan. From what I hear, she's been in tears the last two days. She even threatened to leave the show yesterday at one stage because of the sheer amount of pressure on her.

And you've got to -- you have to remember with Susan, she's a 48-year-old lady from a tiny village in Scotland who has never been exposed to anything like this kind of attention. And I think she's really feeling the heat.

And you know, the hotel she's in is crawling in tourists, crawling in the media. I think she, you know, maybe she overreacted. I don't know what happened. She denies, apparently, some of the things that have been reported.

But either way, I know she's feeling a lot of pressure, and I think that most people watching this show and hearing about this will feel natural sympathy towards her. And just hope it all calms down for the final because on Saturday she sings for the competition.

RODRIGUEZ: Yes. Celebrities have long known fame is a double-edged sword. They love to build you up and tear you down. And you as a former tabloid editor know how irresistible it is, too, for the tabloids to do this.

MORGAN: Well, look, I mean, Susan is the hottest story in town.

And certainly with my old newspaper hat on, I would be reporting on it in the way that they are, because every single thing that Susan has done in the last three or four weeks has been headline news in Britain, in America, in Russia or in China. She's a true global phenomenon.

And with that comes a price. And she is beginning to realize that her life will never be the same. But, you know, I feel very, very sorry for her. At the same time, you know, I've tried to explain to her, look, you know, this is still a wonderful opportunity for you. And most people out there still have great affection for you and are really willing you to victory. So, try and keep calm, don't read the newspapers, don't watch television, keep yourself very cool and composed and just focus on the performance.

RODRIGUEZ: Who is looking out for her interests? Because she is so vulnerable.

MORGAN: She's got people around her. And certainly, there are production people from the show. Simon Cowell, obviously, no one knows better than him how to influence and control the media and try and keep things calm.

I think in the end, though, that Susan is quite naturally feeling the pressure herself. It doesn't really matter what people say to her, she knows that on her semifinal performance, when she sang, she cracked at the start and nearly blew it.

RODRIGUEZ: Right.

MORGAN: And now she knows that she's got this amazing career ahead of her, if she can nail that song on Saturday. And it's going to be a fantastically exciting moment because this is it. This is the two minutes that will define Susan Boyle's life.

RODRIGUEZ: And I have a feeling even more people will be watching because of this. They want to see if she can keep it together. Piers Morgan, thanks a lot.

MORGAN: Well, it's extraordinarily exciting. I can't wait.