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Texas A&M Student Who Allegedly Taunted Black High School Kids Has Left Campus

One student was suspected of making racially charged comments, according to initial reports.
George Bush Presidential Library and Museum on Texas A&M University campus in College Station, Texas. 
George Bush Presidential Library and Museum on Texas A&M University campus in College Station, Texas. 

A student implicated in a case at Texas A&M University where racial slurs were allegedly used against a group of black high school students touring the campus is "no longer associated" with the university, the school said on Wednesday.

Texas A&M would offer no further details about the student due to privacy rules. It added no criminal charges would be brought in the February incident that raised questions about pockets of intolerance at one of the state's biggest universities.

University President Michael Young, who has described the incident as heartbreaking and intolerable, called on the university community to renew its respect for inclusion and diversity.

"We are launching our students into a world where they will need to work with everyone to be successful in addressing the great societal challenges that we, as a country, face," he said in a statement.

Initial reports said more than one university student was suspected of making the racially charged comments but the university on Wednesday did not make clear how many students may have been involved.

"One of the many students interviewed is no longer associated with Texas A&M University," Young said. The university has been investigating reports that at least one student directed racially charged remarks at a group of students from Uplift Hampton Preparatory in Dallas, a charter school with a student body mainly compromised of racial minorities.

Last year, 94 percent of its graduating class went to college and nearly every one of those students was the first person in his or her family to go to college, according to the school.

African-Americans comprise less than 4 percent of the student body at Texas A&M, university data shows. African-Americans made up 12.5 percent of the Texas population in 2014, U.S. Census data showed.

University police interviewed those involved in the incident and has concluded its investigation, police said in a statement.

 

(Reporting by Jon Herskovitz; Editing by Sandra Maler)

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