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The Battle Of New Orleans : Columbia Journalism Review

Prototypes of the future three-day-a-week New Orleans Times-Picayune are seen taped to a door in a workroom in their news off
Prototypes of the future three-day-a-week New Orleans Times-Picayune are seen taped to a door in a workroom in their news offices in New Orleans, Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012. As The Times-Picayune in New Orleans scales back its print edition to three days a week, the Baton Rouge newspaper is starting its own daily edition to try to fill the void. The move by The Advocate sets up an old-fashioned newspaper competition, even as more and more people get their news online and from cellphones.(AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

In May, as the New Orleans Times-Picayune put to bed an epic, eight-part investigation into Louisiana's prison system, its editors began to disappear. First, Mark Lorando, the features editor, was nowhere to be found. Then the chairs of the online editor, Lynn Cunningham, and the sports editor, Doug Tatum, were empty. So was that of the city editor, Gordon Russell. Newsroom wags called it The Rapture.

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