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'The Craft' Producer Reveals Upcoming Remake Is Actually More Of An Update

Producer Doug Wick says it's more like "20 years later."
Robin Tunney, Fairuza Balk, Rachel True and Neve Campbell in a scene from the film "The Craft," 1996.
Robin Tunney, Fairuza Balk, Rachel True and Neve Campbell in a scene from the film "The Craft," 1996.

So about that remake of "The Craft" -- turns out it's not a remake at all, but a sequel of sorts. 

Producer Doug Wick, who also produced Andy Fleming's 1996 original, revealed to HitFix that calling the new project a remake isn't quite right

"I wouldn't say that we wouldn't so much call it a remake as a '20 years later,'" Wick said, later adding, "There will be callbacks to the original movie, so you will see there is a connection between what happened in the days of 'The Craft,' and how these young women come across this magic many years later."

Wick also expanded on how Leigh Janiak, the new film's co-writer and director, and her writing partner Phil Graziadei plan to update the cult classic. 

"Here are some young women who once again discover the power of magic, and we explore their emotional lives, their wants, their fears, their longings, as they become empowered," he told the entertainment website. "So you know, the same way you use a war movie to explore the psyche of men, you get to create a heightened world to explore the psyche of these women. And so that seemed like an opportunity that was ripe and a way to make a movie that would be very much about now."

He also noted that finding a writer who could tell the story today was important, adding that Janiak was the perfect choice. 

"And of course, part of that was just finding a talent that felt like enough of a real talent that you'd really be interested in her interpretation of this kind of story now, and of course Leigh is exactly that," he said. 

It will be interesting to see what Janiak does with the film, but we admit we're still a little skeptical. We will say this, though: presenting the film as an indirect sequel was probably a good call, because we all know that a) no one could ever give justice to the role of Nancy like Fairuza Balk and b) there's no way they could top the film's best scene: 

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