The Deflation of Donald Trump?

Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at the Treasure Island Hotel & Casino in L
Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at the Treasure Island Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada June 18, 2016. REUTERS/David Becker

Cross-posted with TomDispatch.com

Circus, carnival, comedy hour, joke: it's been a festival of insults, charges, racist slams, bizarre proposals, and raging narcissism. I'm talking, of course, about the season of Trump in American politics. When no one gave him a second thought or a chance in hell, he soared and a Trump presidency came into view. As he reached the heights, like an Icarus flying too close to the media sun, his ultimate creation -- himself as a presidential provocateur -- began to melt before our eyes. His campaign manager was axed; his ads went missing; his paid staff remained "skeletal"; his funds were short; his fundraising pathetic; his "unfavorables" headed for the stratosphere (so high that even Hillary Clinton, a candidate with an unfavorable problem of her own, began looking like everybody's best friend); the key members of his party loathed him and that party's popularity was, in any case, sinking fast; corporations were pulling out of his future convention en masse, Republican governors heading for the hills, hundreds of convention delegates threatening revolt (while its chairman promised not to rein them in); a mass shooting/terror incident that Trump should have turned into political gold managed to do less than nothing for him; and that, of course, was just the beginning, not the end, of whatever process is now at work.

It was always obvious that the man with the bouffant hairdo was, in his own way, the most fragile of creatures, and that the illusion of a campaign he had so singlehandedly created might dissolve at any moment.

And The Donald has another problem he hasn't even begun to deal with. In the campaign for the Oval Office, he's facing off against a woman. If the Republican nomination taught us one thing, it was that a bullying man bullying men might carry the day in America, but a bullying man bullying a woman was a problematic spectacle. Hence, his attempt to turn Carly Fiorina's face into an insult backfired radically and gave her lagging campaign brief new life. He now has four months to take on "crooked Hillary" and, sexist as it might be, the Trumpian manner and the mannerisms that go with it are unlikely to serve him well in a nomination-style contest with her.

Under the circumstances, were his pumped up self-creation of a campaign to deflate radically, understand one thing that John Feffer, TomDispatch regular and author of the future Dispatch Book Splinterlands, makes brilliantly clear today in "The Most Important Election of Your Life (Is Not This Year)": no one should take what Donald Trump stands for in this election year less seriously because of that. He may not be the ultimate messenger; he may not even be a serious human being or candidate; but those he's rallied to his side couldn't be more human, serious, or needy. The messenger might not last; the message is another story entirely.