The End Of Dilma Rousseff's Presidency Marks A New Chapter For Democracy In Brazil

A pro-impeachment demonstrator holds a cardboard coffin painted with the name of Brazil's suspended president Dilma Rousseff
A pro-impeachment demonstrator holds a cardboard coffin painted with the name of Brazil's suspended president Dilma Rousseff during a protest in front of the National Congress, in Brasilia, Brazil, August 30, 2016. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly

With a score of 61 votes in favor of the impeachment and 20 against, the Senate removed Dilma Rousseff from office and put an end to a government built on fiscal fraud.

Dilma will be remembered as the president who staged a farce to get reelected, sent 11 million people into unemployment, put the country into a harsh economic crisis and, above all, defied law and order by thwarting the constitution and the powers of the republic in order to stay in office.

Allied to perverse dictatorships like those in Venezuela and Cuba, and hostile to constitutional republics such as Paraguay, Dilma was after the legacy of tyrants: Unlimited and unbridled political power.

Luckily, in the battle between the republic and Dilma, the people of Brazil chose to defend the former.

Dilma's government tried to exploit its power, money, political influence and friends among the business and media elite to escape justice.

We are sending a powerful message to the tyrannical governments across the continent: You are not invincible.

But the millions of Brazilians that took to streets in some of the largest demonstrations in the country's history led the National Congress and the Supreme Court to a point where there was no room for the political conspiracies that attempted to protect the Workers' Party (PT).

After a year of vibrant protests calling for the president's impeachment, the congressmen were forced to carry out their duty and punish the executive branch for the atrocities it has committed.

After a trial that lasted nine months, the constitutional process has come to an end, condemning Dilma to the dustbin of history.

We are sending a powerful message to the tyrannical governments across the continent: You are not invincible, and the people can hold you accountable for your crimes.

Not even the Workers' Party, which has been increasing its presence in federal government over the past 13 years, could stop this powerful movement.

Dilma has been removed from office so that the dream of a free and prosperous Brazil can flourish.

The federal constitution remains strong and intact -- despite the PT's attempts to undermine it.

Rousseff's impeachment is not the red party's only punishment for conspiring against the republic. The Worker's Party may now lose votes in the 2016 and 2018 elections.

The PT's ambition to obtain a political hegemony similar to the one that exists in Venezuela -- conceived and nurtured since Lula and Dirceu came to power -- has now been shattered.

When Dilma took office, she and her allies still exhibited some degree of dignity -- however fake. Today, she describes the process of being removed from power for her crimes a ''parliamentary coup.'' The party's totalitarian mentality has been exposed.

Brazil should not make the same mistake again: The Socialism and Freedom Party, which clearly supports dictatorships, is likely to use the same tactics of pretending to be an ethical and virtuous party while simultaneously compromising freedom and order. They must be denounced at once.

For the time being, there is a lot to celebrate: the institutions and the population showed their willingness to protect the rule of law.

Despite its imperfections, this is a great and important achievement of the "Diretas Já" (the campaign for free and direct elections that took place in 1984). This chapter indicates the rebirth of liberal democracy in Brazil.

Dilma has been removed from office so that the dream of a free and prosperous Brazil can flourish. Like the impeachment, the realization of this goal is in the hands of Brazilians themselves.

This post first appeared on HuffPost Brazil. It has been translated into English and edited for clarity.