POST 50

The Growing Generational Divide

Archie Croll with his wife Caroline and their grandchildren (from left to right) Barrie Bruce, Rebecca Tucker and Anshollo Tu
Archie Croll with his wife Caroline and their grandchildren (from left to right) Barrie Bruce, Rebecca Tucker and Anshollo Tucker, 4th January 1980. (Photo by M. Fresco/Evening Standard/Getty Images)

I was always with older folks when I was very young. They called me “Little Man” and told me I was “an old soul.” I worked in the garden with my grandparents, learned how to count money with Old Man Hoskins at the local store, and eavesdropped on the tales of my ancient neighbors. But it was the stories of my fierce aunt, Sis, that were my favorite.

Unfortunately, it seems there are fewer opportunities for different generations to interact now. The 2010 United States census shows that Appalachia, where I live, has some of the lowest levels of age segregation in the nation. Yet even here I notice a shift away from the intergenerational activity I enjoyed as a child in the 1980s.

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