The Solution to Your New Year’s Resolutions Part Four

Throughout December I’ve shared what New Year’s resolutions you shouldn’t make and which ones you should make instead.

In week one I gave alternative to common resolutions, “be more positive,” and “enjoy life to the fullest.”

In week two I suggested resolutions that would lead to success more realistically than, “spend more time with family” and “manage stress better.”

In week three I challenged popular resolutions, “improve your relationships” and “travel more,” then gave more strategic and practical resolutions instead.

We’ll wrap up my New Year’s resolution series with perhaps two of the most common (and commonly broken) New Year’s resolutions of all time. With just hours left in 2016, here are a couple last minute alternatives to common New Year’s resolutions:

New Year’s resolution don’t: stop procrastinating

New Year’s resolution do: Build the right support environments for your specific goals.

Arbitrarily saying you are going to stop procrastinating may seem like a great resolution that can help many future goals. However, with that resolution alone, there is no game plan to make this mindset shift actually happen.

Instead of committing to end procrastination in theory, put the commitment to action by building accountability into your life through support environments.

You can join a support group, a mastermind for your business, a financial class or even an organization like Alcoholics or Overeaters Anonymous. Building a tribe who will support your goals will lay a foundation to achieve whatever you set your mind to without the temptation to put it off to a later date.

New Year’s resolution don’t: Lose weight

New Year’s resolution do:  Go to the gym three times a week

One of the worst resolutions you can make is to lose weight. There are too many factors at play in someone’s body weight. Body composition can dramatically change with limited to no change in your actual weight. Also, you may have to uncover digestive, hormonal or other health challenges, for example, before you can start seeing any results.

Since there are various paths one can take to ultimately lose weight, a more practical approach is to start building healthy habits one at a time, like committing to join a gym then finding a workout buddy or an awesome class you enjoy. If you commit to going three days a week, people will miss you if you aren’t there and encourage you when you make progress. Resolving to establish the foundational practices that lead to weight loss will produce ongoing wins and keep you focused and hopeful to ultimately lose weight for good.

What are your New Year’s resolutions?

So what do you think? Can you reach these goals as opposed to the more traditional (and vague) resolutions? Let me know in the comments. Hopefully, pointing out eight common (and commonly quit) New Year’s resolutions throughout the month of December, while giving you better choices to make, will help your 2017 shape up to be your most successful year to date!

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