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The Top 10 Tap Water Cities in America

In Louisville, Kentucky, sand and gravel filtration and hundreds of daily tests ensure that even water from the not-so-untouched Ohio River flows from taps sweet and clean.
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What makes a great glass of water? A pristine source, plus careful testing and high-tech filtration and treatment.

by Michael Park, for Rodale's Organic Life



New York City

More than 1 billion daily gallons of sweet, mineral-rich water travels over 125 miles from carefully guarded Catskill Mountains reservoirs.



Stevens Point, Wisconsin

Pulled from aquifers and treated with chlorine, fluoride, and phosphate, the silky, clean sip topped the American Water Works Association (AWWA) 2010 taste test.



Chicago

Moderately hard Lake Michigan water is filtered through carbon and sand for a clean-tasting drink.



Denver

Fed by Rocky Mountains snowmelt, this water's brisk taste is mineral and grassy.



Manchester, New Hampshire

The soft Lake Massabesic water, purified with ozone, has earned kudos from the Partnership for Safe Water for its quality.



Fort Collins, Colorado

Mountain snowmelt and the Cache La Poudre River are coal-filtered and chlorine-treated for a crisp, fresh sip.



Greenville, South Carolina

This Southern city's smooth-tasting supply hails from a pristine, 26,000-acre area of the Blue Ridge foothills.



Silverdale, Washington

The deep Green Mountain aquifer is so pure that the rainwater-fresh H2O can be consumed untreated.



Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Pumped from six manmade lakes, then filtered and treated with ozone, this neutral-tasting stuff won the AWWA contest in 2007 and 2013.



Louisville, Kentucky

Sand and gravel filtration and hundreds of daily tests ensure that even water from the not-so-untouched Ohio River flows from taps sweet and clean.

Go to water.epa.gov/drink/local for more information on your local taps.

This article was originally published on Rodale's Organic Life.

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