ENVIRONMENT

The Untold Story Of What Happened At An Overcrowded West Virigina Jail After The Chemical Spill

CORRECTS STATE TO W.VA. INSTEAD OF VA. - Workers inspect an area outside a retaining wall around storage tanks where a chemic
CORRECTS STATE TO W.VA. INSTEAD OF VA. - Workers inspect an area outside a retaining wall around storage tanks where a chemical leaked into the Elk River at Freedom Industries storage facility in Charleston, W.Va., Monday, Jan. 13, 2014. The ban on tap water for parts of West Virginia was lifted on Monday, ending a crisis for a fraction of the 300,000 people who were told not to drink, wash or cook with water after the chemical spill tainted the water supply. Gov. Earl Tomblin made the announcement at a news conference, five days after people were told to use the water only to flush their toilets. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

When roughly 10,000 gallons of chemicals leaked into a West Virginia watershed this January, Governor Earl Ray Tomblin declared a state of emergency. Officials shut down schools, deployed the National Guard, and rallied volunteers to bring water and support to the 300,000 people without potable water.

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