Trump Campaign Has Yet to Start Organizing in Colorado

Colorado's Trump campaign is relying on the "robust operations" of the Colorado Republican Party to mobilize Trump voters, including "many new people" who are drawn to Trump but are not yet in the campaign databases.

"Because Donald Trump has been bringing so many new people back to politics and to politics, they are really not in our databases," Colorado Trump campaign director Patrick Davis told KLZ 560-AM's John Rush on Thursday.  "We don't know what they believe. In some cases, they are not registered to vote.  In some cases, we don't know how to find them to remind them when Election Day is, because, believe it or not, people do forget. You do have to remind them." [BigMedia emphasis]

Davis said the Colorado Republican Party, with its "robust operations," is tasked with finding these newly politicized people, along with voters of "all stripes," totaling 1.3 million people, the number of votes Davis thinks Trump needs to win in Colorado.

"Because the Trump campaign did not invest in a ground game--everybody knows it; it happened all over the country--we are having to graft ourselves into the robust operations at state Republican parties all over the country," said Davis on air.

After Davis made these comments, a key county Republican chair in Colorado said there's no signs of any Trump ground game in Adams County.

"Honestly, I have not seen [the Trump ground game] in Adams County," Adams County Republican Chair Anil Mathai told KNUS host Chuck Bonniwell Saturday.  "It's consistent with what happened before caucus. Really, there's no ground game. There's no campaign here in the state. I know that [Republican donor and Colorado Statesman owner] Mr. Mizel is helping with fundraising here in Colorado. Also, I believe Mike Shanahan and Pete Coors are helping to raise major donations for Mr. Trump."

Still, Davis sounded optimistic about Trump's chances in Colorado.

"Colorado is one of 11 battleground states, and the state Republican Party here has been preparing for this day for over a year," Davis said on the radio. "Now, I run campaigns based on metrics and numbers. We believe that for Donald Trump to win Colorado, he needs to identify and turn out 1.3 million voters in Colorado of all stripes. Republicans, Democrats, independents, Libertarians, liberals, conservatives, we got to turn them out."

Trump officials have been saying in recent weeks that the campaign will rely on state parties, which have uneven strengths around the country.

The unprecedented upheaval in Colorado's state GOP in recent years, including the ouster of state chair Ryan Call last March, led by Colorado Attorney General Cynthia Coffman, and the subsequent efforts to depose current chair Steve House last summer, raise questions about the robustness of the party's operations. But House has insisted in recent radio interviews that the party is fully functional and up to the tasks it needs to perform to win races up and down the ticket in November.