Trump Gives a Whole New Meaning to the Phrase, "I'm Dreaming of a White Christmas"

Twenty-five more days until the opening line of the classic song "White Christmas" takes on a significance way beyond the meteorological meaning Irving Berlin could have imagined when he wrote "I'm dreaming of a white Christmas just like the one I used to know."

In Donald Trump's America, any skin shade but white (except his own orange tone) represents a divergence with the norm.

Consider how his election has emboldened racism, bigotry and prejudice across the land, a most repugnant example of which came forth last week from Carl Paladino, a former Republican gubernatorial candidate in New York, co-chair of Trump's New York state campaign and currently s member of Buffalo's school board.

It was a no-brainer for Team Trump to disavow Paladino's comments but the man himself was not rebuked. Moreover, a president-elect who has taken the time to chastise via Twitter Saturday Night Live, Alec Baldwin, the cast of Hamilton, among others, has yet to send out 140 characters admonishing Paladino.

In Donald Trump's America, white will be the dominant color upon which success may be assured. His exhortation of "Merry Christmas" is a bellicose rejection of the multicultural, religiously diverse "Happy Holidays."

Is Trump truly a racist? Hard to say definitively, but it would be naive to believe he does not recognize the bigotry that has burst into the open because of his candidacy and election. Whether he accepts their support or not, Trump has made it acceptable to openly hate, to openly oppose civil rights advances of the last half century, to openly question the legitimacy of legal immigrants and their constitutional rights.

Carl Paladino exposed the racist underbelly of many of Trump's supporters. Unless the next president forcefully rejects this cancer of hate, not once, not twice but every time it rears its ugly, divisive head, Donald Trump will not be upholding the oath of office he will swear to at noon on January 20, 2017.