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Here Are All The TV Shows You've Never Heard Of That Won Golden Globes

Who won what?
Rachel Bloom, winner of the award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series - Musical or Comedy for "Crazy Ex
Rachel Bloom, winner of the award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series - Musical or Comedy for "Crazy Ex-Girlfriend," poses in the press room during the Golden Globes.

Best Actor? "Mozart in the Jungle." Best Comedy? "Mozart in the Jungle." Best TV shows that randomly won all the awards? "Mozart in the Jungle."

All kidding aside, the Golden Globes has a history of celebrating television shows that might not get awards love at some of the more prestigious ceremonies. That wasn't shade, GG. You're still the fun drunk cousin of award shows, and we love you.

If you found yourself saying, "Whaaa?" or "Who?" at the Globes last night, worry not, because we've got a complete rundown of some of the winning TV series that you should've been watching a long time ago.

"Crazy Ex-Girlfriend"

Rachel Bloom took home the award for Best Actress in a Television Series, Comedy or Musical for her starring role in the CW's "Crazy Ex-Girlfriend." In her acceptance speech, Bloom mentioned the series' difficult road to production -- after Showtime passed on its pilot, it was unclear if the hourlong musical comedy would find a home. Haters be damned, because "Crazy Ex-Girlfriend has become the shining star of this year's TV season. Featuring endearingly zany performances by Bloom and the rest of the ensemble and some seriously catchy songs you'll be singing in the shower weeks after an episode airs, "Crazy Ex-Girlfriend" is a largely undiscovered gem buried among vampires and apocalypse-challenged teens on the CW. Do yourself a solid and check this one out. 

"Mozart in the Jungle"

Amazon's "Mozart in the Jungle" is a comedic drama that stars Gael García Bernal, and in our opinion that's reason enough to tune in. Bernal plays a charming conductor who takes on the role of maestro of the New York Symphony, and Lola Kirke (sister of "Girls" star Jemima Kirke) stars as a young oboist just looking for her big break. The series was inspired by oboist Blair Tindall's 2005 memoir, Mozart in the Jungle: Sex, Drugs, and Classical Music. The show has clearly won audiences over -- it took home the Golden Globe for Best Television Series, Musical or Comedy, and Bernal picked up the award for Actor in a Television Series, Musical or Comedy -- just released its second season. If you're a lover of music, drama and a little romance, "Mozart in the Jungle" will hit all the right notes for you. 

Producer Colin Callender accepts the award for Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television for "Wolf
Producer Colin Callender accepts the award for Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television for "Wolf Hall" during the Golden Globes Sunday night.

"Wolf Hall"

Adapted from Hilary Mantel's fictionalized accounts of King Henry VIII's court, Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies, PBS' period miniseries boasted some of the best acting talents on screen, including famed British theater actor, Mark Rylance, who rarely appears on television. The six-episode miniseries documents the rise and fall of Thomas Cromwell, the trusted advisor of King Henry VIII, played by Damian Lewis. "Wolf Hall" has it all: blood, sex, political intrigue and beautiful costumes and sets that would make Henry himself jealous. The costume drama took home Best Miniseries or Motion Picture Made for Television, beating out industry favorites like "American Horror Story: Hotel" and "Fargo." PBS FTW.

"Show Me a Hero"

If you, like us, fell even more in love with Oscar Isaac this year, you'll probably want to watch "Show Me a Hero." Isaac, who won the Globe for Actor in a Leading Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television, stars as Yonkers' youngest-ever mayor, Nick Wasicsko, who took office in 1987 and fought for the desegregation of public housing. The show was based on Lisa Belkin's book of the same name and was created by David Simon, the man who brought us "The Wire," and directed by Paul Haggis ("Crash"). The series explores everything from the idea of home, race and community by looking at life though the lenses of politics, activism and citizenship. If you're into dramas with themes of social justice, you'll probably be a fan.

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