CRIME

Uber Driver Burglarized Home After Dropping Customers Off At Airport, Police Say

Jackie Gordon Wilson, 38, tried to steal from riders he knew wouldn't be home, according to San Mateo police.

An Uber driver in California dropped off a couple at an airport last week then drove back to the neighborhood to burglarize their home, police said.

Jackie Gordon Wilson, 38, was arrested Friday by San Mateo Police Department detectives after home security footage appeared to capture him trying to break into the passengers’ home a day earlier.

Police said Wilson targeted homes of people he knew wouldn’t be home, KPIX reported. The attempted burglary at his passengers’ home was thwarted after an alarm went off, authorities said. 

Wilson was later recorded breaking into another home a few blocks away that was equipped with the same home security equipment, according to police.

He “completely ransacked” the second home, where multiple items were found to be stolen, authorities said.

The booking photo for Uber driver Jackie Gordon Wilson, provided by the San Mateo Police Department in California.
The booking photo for Uber driver Jackie Gordon Wilson, provided by the San Mateo Police Department in California.

Police used information obtained from the Uber app to locate Wilson and arrested him at his home in Rancho Cordova, roughly 10 miles east of Sacramento, ABC News reported.

At the time of his arrest, Wilson was allegedly wearing the same clothes he was seen in on the home security videos a day earlier. Police said they were able to recover some of the stolen items from the second house.

Wilson was booked at the San Mateo County Jail on charges of burglary, attempted burglary, and unlawfully obstructing, resisting or delaying a peace officer in the performance of their duty.

Uber removed Wilson’s access to its app after learning of the allegations against him and stands “ready to assist police in their investigation,” a company spokesperson told HuffPost in a statement Wednesday.

The Uber spokesperson noted that riders can enter cross streets as their pick-up location instead of exact addresses and that drivers don’t have access to addresses in their trip history.

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