LATINO VOICES

Univision Buys Leading Black News Site The Root

** FILE ** The exterior of Univision's Los Angeles headquarters is seen in a file photo from Aug. 5, 2003. In the months sinc
** FILE ** The exterior of Univision's Los Angeles headquarters is seen in a file photo from Aug. 5, 2003. In the months since Univision Communications Inc. put itself on the market, the burning question hasn't been whether anyone would be interested in acquiring the top Spanish-language broadcaster in the U.S., but how much would they be willing to pay. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon, File)

The Root has a new home to grow in.

Hispanic media juggernaut Univision Communications Inc. bought the site from Graham Holdings Co. for an undisclosed amount in a deal announced Thursday. Univision hopes the acquisition of the leading black news site in the country will help expand their audience as demographics in the country continue to shift.

“Like Univision, The Root aims to serve a significant segment of America’s diverse population,” Isaac Lee, president of news and digital for Univision Communications, said in a press release. “Our diverse communities are continuing to define the fabric of the country, from buying power, to social influence, to elections.”

“This game-changing union strengthens our ability to fulfill our shared missions of informing and empowering our communities,” he added. Lee is also CEO of Fusion, a joint venture of Univision and ABC News targeting millennials.

Univision is the leading Spanish-language broadcaster in the country, with digital entities online and on mobile. The launch of Fusion in October 2013 marked its first English-language venture. The company recently launched a digital video site, The Flama, also targeting an English-dominant Latino audience.

The Root will retain its editorial voice and mission but will now have access to greater resources, including Univision’s digital production facilities and publishing infrastructure, Univision said.

The Root's chairman, Henry Louis Gates Jr., who co-founded the site in 2008 with Donald Graham, praised the deal.

“This bold new partnership between Univision and The Root underscores the ties that have long bound people of color together throughout the Western Hemisphere and is a sign of even greater levels of communication, collaboration and exchange between these culturally vital groups of people,” Gates said in the press release.

The Root has an average of 5 million monthly unique visitors in the United States, according to data from digital analytics firm ComScore. The Root is also the most visited site within its demographic when compared to leading black news and culture sites HuffPost Black Voices, The Grio and News One in a ComScore competitive custom set.

HuffPost

BEFORE YOU GO

  • 1 Because lots of Americans speak Spanish
    As of 2012, approximately 38.3 million people in the U.S. spoke&nbsp;Spanish at home, according to the <a href="http://www.ce
    Getty
    As of 2012, approximately 38.3 million people in the U.S. spoke Spanish at home, according to the U.S. Census. That's 13 percent of U.S. residents ages 5 and older. 
  • 2 Because a bunch of our states, cities and streets have Spanish names
    Nevada, Colorado, Los Angeles, Florida, Montana, San Antonio, California and Sacramento are all Spanish words or names. The l
    Getty
    Nevada, Colorado, Los Angeles, Florida, Montana, San Antonio, California and Sacramento are all Spanish words or names. The list goes on and on.
  • 3 Because Spanish was spoken in what is today the United States before English
    Spanish colonizers first set foot in the area that would become the United States in the 16th century, <a href="http://www.st
    Getty Images
    Spanish colonizers first set foot in the area that would become the United States in the 16th century, founding a permanent colony in St. Augustine, Florida, in 1565 -- well before the English set up Jamestown. All European languages, on the other hand, are more foreign to North America than Karuk, Cherokee, Natchez or the scores of other languages of the indigenous peoples of the continent.
  • 4 Because the U.S. has more Spanish speakers than Spain
    In 2013, the U.S. had the 5th largest Spanish-speaking population in the world. However, in 2015 it moved up to the <a href="
    Getty Images
    In 2013, the U.S. had the 5th largest Spanish-speaking population in the world. However, in 2015 it moved up to the number two spot behind Mexico.
  • 5 Because it’s the most-spoken language on the island of Puerto Rico
    And Puerto Rico is a U.S. territory whose inhabitants are U.S. citizens.
    Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images
    And Puerto Rico is a U.S. territory whose inhabitants are U.S. citizens.
  • 6 Because the U.S. does not have an official language
    English is not the official language of the United States.&nbsp;Though <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/govbeat/
    Getty Images
    English is not the official language of the United States. Though several states across the nation have adopted legislation establishing English as their official language, no such legislation has been adopted on a federal level.
  • 7 Because even English-speaking people use Spanish words on a daily basis
    Words like "cafeteria," "vanilla," and even "ranch" are derived from Spanish.&nbsp;
    Creatas via Getty Images
    Words like "cafeteria," "vanilla," and even "ranch" are derived from Spanish. 
  • 8 Because this Spanish-language network is a ratings beast
    Spanish broadcast network Univision regularly <a href="http://corporate.univision.com/2016/05/may-sweeps-to-date-univision-ra
    Photo by Alexander Tamargo/WireImage
    Spanish broadcast network Univision regularly outperforms English-language networks, especially on a local level. Univision stations in Los Angeles, New York, Houston and Sacramento closed out the May 2016 sweeps period as the most-watched early and late local newscasts among Adults ages 18-49, regardless of language.
  • 9 Because Spanish is becoming the second-most important language in politics
    Even candidates vying for political office recognize the fact that many of the nation's citizens speak Spanish, many releasin
    Getty
    Even candidates vying for political office recognize the fact that many of the nation's citizens speak Spanish, many releasing Spanish-language ads in an effort to connect with voters. 
CONVERSATIONS