Why the Veggan Diet Is Pretty Disrespectful

As veganism becomes more popular, its founding principles can get overshadowed by secondary benefits.

It's a testament to the lifestyle. The pros of veganism are so multifaceted that people from different backgrounds find something in it that speaks to them, but it's always important to know the fundamentals of vegansim and respect what the movement stands for.

A new diet is growing in popularity that uses the term "vegan" in a non-vegan way. Vegganism allows the traditional vegan staples of fruits, vegetables, grains, beans, nuts and seed but makes an allowance for eggs as well.

It fuses the health benefits of vegan eating with the protein and accessibility of eggs to make a sexier, easily hashtagged synonym for ovo-vegetarian. The diet seems nutritious, so what's the problem?

Veganism has nothing to do with nutrition.

Here's The Vegan Society's definition of veganism:

A philosophy and way of living which seeks to exclude -- as far as is possible and practicable -- all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose; and by extension, promotes the development and use of animal-free alternatives for the benefit of humans, animals and the environment. In dietary terms, it denotes the practice of dispensing with all products derived wholly or partly from animals.

Veganism is an animal rights movement. We eat plants simply because they're not animals, but the lifestyle is about animal liberation and not human health.

True vegans don't support household items that have been tested on animals, clothing made from fabric derived from animals, any form of entertainment that comes at the expense of sentient non-humans, and always avoid foods (like eggs) that come from animal enslavement.

Most vegans would agree unfertilized eggs aren't animals, but there is still animal cruelty associated with every carton.

Male chicks are considered unwanted byproducts in the egg industry. Since males don't lay eggs and grow too slowly for meat, they're killed soon after birth.

Vegans also avoid eggs because supporting the industry funds a lifetime of enslavement. Hens are kept alive for about two years and expected to constantly produce eggs until they're killed for meat.

"Veggan" is an oxymoron. The word represents animal liberation and animal slaughter in the same two syllables.

Vegans usually make passes for so-called vegans who still buy leather or use products tested on animals, but to align yourself with veganism while supporting the egg industry shows a new level of disregard for everything veganism stands for.

So how can you still get the satisfaction of eggs while staying true to veganism? Luckily there's animal-free substitutes for just about everything--including eggs.

Follow Your Heart recently launched the most realistic vegan egg on the market. It won't have the runny yolk you're used to, but it's also missing the cholesterol and cruelty.

Ramen Hood in Los Angeles makes vegan ramen with an egg to match, and there are plenty of egg substitutes to use in recipes.

There's no need to go against the fundamentals of veganism when there are vegan-friendly alternatives everywhere.

Veganism has been repackaged as a health movement for years. Many don't understand what being vegan is truly about, so "veggan" is more of a misunderstanding than a blatant display of disrespect for animal rights.

While it's important to clarify that vegganism is not in line with vegan fundamentals, we do recognize that the low meat and dairy consumption that comes with veggan eating is reducing demand for animal products and indirectly supporting the vegan cause.

Your contribution is appreciated and you're well on your way to a proper vegan lifestyle. Throughout your ovo-vegetarian journey, we hope you recall what veganism stands for and consider removing eggs from your diet.

For more vegan info and opinion, visit veganzinga.com